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Steel Making

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Pyrometry And Pyrometers
A knowledge of the fundamental principles of pyrometry, or th...

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Carburizing Low-carbon Sleeves
Low-carbon sleeves are carburized and pushed on malleable-ir...



Molybdenum






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five years,
but they have not been widely exploited until since the war. Very
large resources of molybdenum have been developed in America, and
the mining companies who are equipped to produce the metal are
very active in advertising the advantages of molybdenum steels.

It was early found that 1 part molybdenum was the equivalent of from
2 to 2-1/2 parts of tungsten in tool steels, and magnet steels. It
fell into disrepute as an alloy for high-speed tool steel, however,
because it was found that the molybdenum was driven out of the
surface of the tool during forging and heat treating.

Within the last few years it has been found that the presence of
less than 1 per cent of molybdenum greatly enhances certain properties
of heat-treated carbon and alloy steels used for automobiles and
high-grade machinery.

In general, molybdenum when added to an alloy steel, increases the
figure for reduction of area, which is considered a good measure
of toughness. Molybdenum steels are also relatively insensible
to variations in heat treatment; that is to say, a
chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel after quenching in oil from 1,450 deg.F.
may be drawn at any temperature between 900 and 1,100 deg.F. with
substantially the same result (static tensile properties and hardness).





Next: Silicon

Previous: Tungsten



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