VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.steelmaking.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
   Home - Steel Making - Categories - Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

The Leeds And Northrup Potentiometer System
The potentiometer pyrometer system is both flexible and subst...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Heat Treatment Of Lathe Planer And Similar Tools
FIRE.--For these tools a good fire is one made of hard foundr...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...



Molybdenum






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five years,
but they have not been widely exploited until since the war. Very
large resources of molybdenum have been developed in America, and
the mining companies who are equipped to produce the metal are
very active in advertising the advantages of molybdenum steels.

It was early found that 1 part molybdenum was the equivalent of from
2 to 2-1/2 parts of tungsten in tool steels, and magnet steels. It
fell into disrepute as an alloy for high-speed tool steel, however,
because it was found that the molybdenum was driven out of the
surface of the tool during forging and heat treating.

Within the last few years it has been found that the presence of
less than 1 per cent of molybdenum greatly enhances certain properties
of heat-treated carbon and alloy steels used for automobiles and
high-grade machinery.

In general, molybdenum when added to an alloy steel, increases the
figure for reduction of area, which is considered a good measure
of toughness. Molybdenum steels are also relatively insensible
to variations in heat treatment; that is to say, a
chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel after quenching in oil from 1,450 deg.F.
may be drawn at any temperature between 900 and 1,100 deg.F. with
substantially the same result (static tensile properties and hardness).





Next: Silicon

Previous: Tungsten



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 4787