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Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

The Care Of Carburizing Compounds
Of all the opportunities for practicing economy in the heat-t...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Detrimental Elements
Sulphur and phosphorus are two elements known to be detrimen...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...



Molybdenum






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five years,
but they have not been widely exploited until since the war. Very
large resources of molybdenum have been developed in America, and
the mining companies who are equipped to produce the metal are
very active in advertising the advantages of molybdenum steels.

It was early found that 1 part molybdenum was the equivalent of from
2 to 2-1/2 parts of tungsten in tool steels, and magnet steels. It
fell into disrepute as an alloy for high-speed tool steel, however,
because it was found that the molybdenum was driven out of the
surface of the tool during forging and heat treating.

Within the last few years it has been found that the presence of
less than 1 per cent of molybdenum greatly enhances certain properties
of heat-treated carbon and alloy steels used for automobiles and
high-grade machinery.

In general, molybdenum when added to an alloy steel, increases the
figure for reduction of area, which is considered a good measure
of toughness. Molybdenum steels are also relatively insensible
to variations in heat treatment; that is to say, a
chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel after quenching in oil from 1,450 deg.F.
may be drawn at any temperature between 900 and 1,100 deg.F. with
substantially the same result (static tensile properties and hardness).





Next: Silicon

Previous: Tungsten



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