Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 
   Home - Steel Making - Categories - Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Heat Treatment Of Lathe Planer And Similar Tools
FIRE.--For these tools a good fire is one made of hard foundr...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

The Forging Of Steel
So much depends upon the forging of steel that this operation...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Open Hearth Process
The open hearth furnace consists of a big brick room with a l...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...



Molybdenum






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five years,
but they have not been widely exploited until since the war. Very
large resources of molybdenum have been developed in America, and
the mining companies who are equipped to produce the metal are
very active in advertising the advantages of molybdenum steels.

It was early found that 1 part molybdenum was the equivalent of from
2 to 2-1/2 parts of tungsten in tool steels, and magnet steels. It
fell into disrepute as an alloy for high-speed tool steel, however,
because it was found that the molybdenum was driven out of the
surface of the tool during forging and heat treating.

Within the last few years it has been found that the presence of
less than 1 per cent of molybdenum greatly enhances certain properties
of heat-treated carbon and alloy steels used for automobiles and
high-grade machinery.

In general, molybdenum when added to an alloy steel, increases the
figure for reduction of area, which is considered a good measure
of toughness. Molybdenum steels are also relatively insensible
to variations in heat treatment; that is to say, a
chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel after quenching in oil from 1,450 deg.F.
may be drawn at any temperature between 900 and 1,100 deg.F. with
substantially the same result (static tensile properties and hardness).





Next: Silicon

Previous: Tungsten



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 3179