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Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

Lathe And Planer Tools
TO FORGE.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill is parti...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Testing And Inspection Of Heat Treatment
The hard parts of the gear must be so hard that a new mill f...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

Calibration Of Pyrometer With Common Salt
An easy and convenient method for standardization and one whi...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...



Molybdenum






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five years,
but they have not been widely exploited until since the war. Very
large resources of molybdenum have been developed in America, and
the mining companies who are equipped to produce the metal are
very active in advertising the advantages of molybdenum steels.

It was early found that 1 part molybdenum was the equivalent of from
2 to 2-1/2 parts of tungsten in tool steels, and magnet steels. It
fell into disrepute as an alloy for high-speed tool steel, however,
because it was found that the molybdenum was driven out of the
surface of the tool during forging and heat treating.

Within the last few years it has been found that the presence of
less than 1 per cent of molybdenum greatly enhances certain properties
of heat-treated carbon and alloy steels used for automobiles and
high-grade machinery.

In general, molybdenum when added to an alloy steel, increases the
figure for reduction of area, which is considered a good measure
of toughness. Molybdenum steels are also relatively insensible
to variations in heat treatment; that is to say, a
chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel after quenching in oil from 1,450 deg.F.
may be drawn at any temperature between 900 and 1,100 deg.F. with
substantially the same result (static tensile properties and hardness).





Next: Silicon

Previous: Tungsten



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