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Steel Making

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Bessemer Process
The bessemer process consists of charging molten pig iron int...

Preparing Parts For Local Case-hardening
At the works of the Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, ...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Tempering Colors On Carbon Steels
Opinions differ as to the temperature which is indicated by t...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

The Thermo-couple
With the application of the thermo-couple, the measurement of...

Carbon Tool Steel
Heat to a bright red, about 1,500 to 1,550 deg.F. Do not ham...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...



Molybdenum






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five years,
but they have not been widely exploited until since the war. Very
large resources of molybdenum have been developed in America, and
the mining companies who are equipped to produce the metal are
very active in advertising the advantages of molybdenum steels.

It was early found that 1 part molybdenum was the equivalent of from
2 to 2-1/2 parts of tungsten in tool steels, and magnet steels. It
fell into disrepute as an alloy for high-speed tool steel, however,
because it was found that the molybdenum was driven out of the
surface of the tool during forging and heat treating.

Within the last few years it has been found that the presence of
less than 1 per cent of molybdenum greatly enhances certain properties
of heat-treated carbon and alloy steels used for automobiles and
high-grade machinery.

In general, molybdenum when added to an alloy steel, increases the
figure for reduction of area, which is considered a good measure
of toughness. Molybdenum steels are also relatively insensible
to variations in heat treatment; that is to say, a
chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel after quenching in oil from 1,450 deg.F.
may be drawn at any temperature between 900 and 1,100 deg.F. with
substantially the same result (static tensile properties and hardness).





Next: Silicon

Previous: Tungsten



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