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Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

S A E Heat Treatments
The Society of Automotive Engineers have adopted certain heat...

Annealing Method
Forgings which are too hard to machine are put in pots with ...

Shrinking And Enlarging Work
Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...

Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

The Electric Process
The fourth method of manufacturing steel is by the electric f...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...



Molybdenum






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five years,
but they have not been widely exploited until since the war. Very
large resources of molybdenum have been developed in America, and
the mining companies who are equipped to produce the metal are
very active in advertising the advantages of molybdenum steels.

It was early found that 1 part molybdenum was the equivalent of from
2 to 2-1/2 parts of tungsten in tool steels, and magnet steels. It
fell into disrepute as an alloy for high-speed tool steel, however,
because it was found that the molybdenum was driven out of the
surface of the tool during forging and heat treating.

Within the last few years it has been found that the presence of
less than 1 per cent of molybdenum greatly enhances certain properties
of heat-treated carbon and alloy steels used for automobiles and
high-grade machinery.

In general, molybdenum when added to an alloy steel, increases the
figure for reduction of area, which is considered a good measure
of toughness. Molybdenum steels are also relatively insensible
to variations in heat treatment; that is to say, a
chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel after quenching in oil from 1,450 deg.F.
may be drawn at any temperature between 900 and 1,100 deg.F. with
substantially the same result (static tensile properties and hardness).





Next: Silicon

Previous: Tungsten



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