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Steel Making

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Annealing
There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Annealing Of High-speed Steel
For annealing high-speed steel, some makers recommend using g...

High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel
High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing f...

The Thermo-couple
With the application of the thermo-couple, the measurement of...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Preparing Parts For Local Case-hardening
At the works of the Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, ...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...



Molybdenum






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five years,
but they have not been widely exploited until since the war. Very
large resources of molybdenum have been developed in America, and
the mining companies who are equipped to produce the metal are
very active in advertising the advantages of molybdenum steels.

It was early found that 1 part molybdenum was the equivalent of from
2 to 2-1/2 parts of tungsten in tool steels, and magnet steels. It
fell into disrepute as an alloy for high-speed tool steel, however,
because it was found that the molybdenum was driven out of the
surface of the tool during forging and heat treating.

Within the last few years it has been found that the presence of
less than 1 per cent of molybdenum greatly enhances certain properties
of heat-treated carbon and alloy steels used for automobiles and
high-grade machinery.

In general, molybdenum when added to an alloy steel, increases the
figure for reduction of area, which is considered a good measure
of toughness. Molybdenum steels are also relatively insensible
to variations in heat treatment; that is to say, a
chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel after quenching in oil from 1,450 deg.F.
may be drawn at any temperature between 900 and 1,100 deg.F. with
substantially the same result (static tensile properties and hardness).





Next: Silicon

Previous: Tungsten



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