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Steel Making

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

High Speed Steel
For centuries the secret art of making tool steel was handed ...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

The Forging Of Steel
So much depends upon the forging of steel that this operation...

Properties Of Steel
Steels are known by certain tests. Early tests were more or l...

Sulphur
Sulphur is another impurity and high sulphur is even a greate...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...



Process Of Carburizing






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon
content to a low-carbon steel. This produces what might be termed
a dual steel, allowing for an outer shell which when hardened
would withstand wear, and a soft ductile core to produce ductility
and withstand shock. The operation is carried out by packing the
work to be carburized in boxes with a material rich in carbon and
maintaining the box so charged at a temperature in excess of the
highest critical point for a length of time to produce the desired
depth of carburized zone. Generally maintaining the temperature
at 1,650 to 1,700 deg. F. for 7 hr. will produce a carburized zone
1/32 in. deep.

Heating to a temperature slightly above the highest critical point
and cooling suddenly in some quenching medium, such as water or oil
hardens the steel. This treatment produces a maximum refinement
with the maximum strength.

Drawing to a temperature below the highest critical point (the
temperature being governed by the results required) relieves the
hardening strains set up by quenching, as well as the reducing
of the hardness and brittleness of hardened steel.





Next: Effects Of Proper Annealing

Previous: Annealing Work



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