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Steel Making

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Heat Treatment Of Lathe Planer And Similar Tools
FIRE.--For these tools a good fire is one made of hard foundr...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Carbon Tool Steel
Heat to a bright red, about 1,500 to 1,550 deg.F. Do not ham...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

Refining The Grain
This is remedied by reheating the piece to a temperature slig...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

Calibration Of Pyrometer With Common Salt
An easy and convenient method for standardization and one whi...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...



Restoring Overheated Steel






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown graphically
in Fig. 65 to the series of illustrations on pages 137 to 144. This
was prepared by Thos. Firth & Sons, Ltd., Sheffield, England.



The center piece Fig. 65 represents a block of steel weighing about
25 lb. The central hole accommodated a thermo-couple which was attached
to an autographic recorder. The curve is a copy of the temperature
record during heating and cooling. Into the holes in the side of
the block small pegs of overheated mild steel were inserted. One
peg was withdrawn and quenched at each of the temperatures indicated
by the numbered arrows, and after suitable preparation these pegs
were photographed in order to show the changes in structure taking
place during heating and cooling operations. The illustrations here
reproduced are selected from those photographs with the object
of presenting pictorially the changes involved in the refining of
overheated steel or steel castings.





Next: Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools

Previous: S A E Heat Treatments



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