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Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Forging High-speed Steel
Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800 to 2,000 deg.F....

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Preventing Decarbonization Of Tool Steel
It is especially important to prevent decarbonization in such...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Annealing Method
Forgings which are too hard to machine are put in pots with ...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Refining The Grain
This is remedied by reheating the piece to a temperature slig...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Standard Analysis
The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is t...

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Properties Of Steel
Steels are known by certain tests. Early tests were more or l...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

The Thermo-couple
With the application of the thermo-couple, the measurement of...



Restoring Overheated Steel






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown graphically
in Fig. 65 to the series of illustrations on pages 137 to 144. This
was prepared by Thos. Firth & Sons, Ltd., Sheffield, England.



The center piece Fig. 65 represents a block of steel weighing about
25 lb. The central hole accommodated a thermo-couple which was attached
to an autographic recorder. The curve is a copy of the temperature
record during heating and cooling. Into the holes in the side of
the block small pegs of overheated mild steel were inserted. One
peg was withdrawn and quenched at each of the temperatures indicated
by the numbered arrows, and after suitable preparation these pegs
were photographed in order to show the changes in structure taking
place during heating and cooling operations. The illustrations here
reproduced are selected from those photographs with the object
of presenting pictorially the changes involved in the refining of
overheated steel or steel castings.





Next: Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools

Previous: S A E Heat Treatments



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