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Steel Making

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

Preventing Decarbonization Of Tool Steel
It is especially important to prevent decarbonization in such...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Calibration Of Pyrometer With Common Salt
An easy and convenient method for standardization and one whi...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Placing The Thermo-couples
The following illustrations from the Taylor Instrument Compan...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Tempering Colors On Carbon Steels
Opinions differ as to the temperature which is indicated by t...



S A E Heat Treatments






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

The Society of Automotive Engineers have adopted certain heat treatments
to suit different steels and varying conditions. These have already
been referred to on pages 39 to 41 in connection with the different
steels used in automobile practice. These treatments are designated
by letter and correspond with the designations in the table.

HEAT TREATMENTS

Heat Treatment A

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize at a temperature between 1,600 deg.F. and 1,750 deg.F.
(1,650-1,700 deg.F. desired.)
2. Cool slowly or quench.
3. Reheat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F. and quench.

Heat Treatment B

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize between 1,600 deg.F. and 1,750 deg.F. (1,650-1,700 deg.F.
Desired.)
2. Cool slowly in the carbonizing mixture.
3. Reheat to 1,550-1,625 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 1,400-1,450 deg.F.
6. Quench.
7. Draw in hot oil at 300 to 450 deg.F., depending upon the degree of
hardness desired.

Heat Treatment D

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,600 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 600-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment E

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,550 deg.F.
2. Cool slowly.
3. Reheat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 600-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment F

After shaping or coiling:
1. Heat to 1,425-1,475 deg.F.
2. Quench in oil.
3. Reheat to 400-900 deg.F., in accordance with temper desired and cool
slowly.

Heat Treatment G

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize at a temperature between 1,600 deg.F. and 1,750 deg.F.
(1,650-1,700 deg.F. desired).
2. Cool slowly in the carbonizing mixture.
3. Reheat to 1,500-1,550 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 1,300-1,400 deg.F.
6. Quench.
7. Reheat to 250-500 deg.F. (in accordance with the necessities of the case)
and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment H

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,600 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 600-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment K

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,550 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 1,300-1,400 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 600-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment L

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize between 1,600 deg.F. and 1,750 deg.F. (1,650-1,700 deg.F. desired).
2. Cool slowly in the carbonizing mixture.
3. Reheat to 1,400-1,500 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 1,300-1,400 deg.F.
6. Quench.
7. Reheat to 250-500 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment M

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 500-1.250 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment P

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 1,375-1,450 deg.F. slowly.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 500-1,250 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment Q

After forging:
1. Heat to 1,475-1,525 deg.F. (Hold at this temperature one-half hour,
to insure thorough heating.)
2. Cool slowly.
3. Machine.
4. Reheat to 1,375-1,425 deg.F.
5. Quench.
6. Reheat to 250-550 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment R

After forging:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,550 deg.F.
2. Quench in oil.
3. Reheat to 1,200-1,300 deg.F. (Hold at this temperature three hours.)
4. Cool slowly.
5. Machine.
6. Reheat to 1,350-1,450 deg.F.
7. Quench in oil.
8. Reheat to 250-500 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment S

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize at a temperature between 1,600 and 1,750 deg.F.
(1,650-1,700 deg.F. Desired.)
2. Cool slowly in the carbonizing mixture.
3. Reheat to 1,650-1,750 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 1,475-1,550 deg.F.
6. Quench.
7. Reheat to 250-550 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment T

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,650-1,750 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 500-1,300 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment U

After forging:
1. Heat to 1,525-1,600 deg.F. (Hold for about one-half hour.)
2. Cool slowly.
3. Machine.
4. Reheat to 1,650-1,700 deg.F.
5. Quench.
6. Reheat to 350-550 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment V

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,650-1,750 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 400-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.





Next: Restoring Overheated Steel

Previous: Drop Forging Dies



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