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Steel Making

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Preparing Parts For Local Case-hardening
At the works of the Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, ...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

Sulphur
Sulphur is another impurity and high sulphur is even a greate...

Nickel-chromium
A combination of the characteristics of nickel and the charac...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...



S A E Heat Treatments






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

The Society of Automotive Engineers have adopted certain heat treatments
to suit different steels and varying conditions. These have already
been referred to on pages 39 to 41 in connection with the different
steels used in automobile practice. These treatments are designated
by letter and correspond with the designations in the table.

HEAT TREATMENTS

Heat Treatment A

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize at a temperature between 1,600 deg.F. and 1,750 deg.F.
(1,650-1,700 deg.F. desired.)
2. Cool slowly or quench.
3. Reheat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F. and quench.

Heat Treatment B

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize between 1,600 deg.F. and 1,750 deg.F. (1,650-1,700 deg.F.
Desired.)
2. Cool slowly in the carbonizing mixture.
3. Reheat to 1,550-1,625 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 1,400-1,450 deg.F.
6. Quench.
7. Draw in hot oil at 300 to 450 deg.F., depending upon the degree of
hardness desired.

Heat Treatment D

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,600 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 600-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment E

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,550 deg.F.
2. Cool slowly.
3. Reheat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 600-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment F

After shaping or coiling:
1. Heat to 1,425-1,475 deg.F.
2. Quench in oil.
3. Reheat to 400-900 deg.F., in accordance with temper desired and cool
slowly.

Heat Treatment G

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize at a temperature between 1,600 deg.F. and 1,750 deg.F.
(1,650-1,700 deg.F. desired).
2. Cool slowly in the carbonizing mixture.
3. Reheat to 1,500-1,550 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 1,300-1,400 deg.F.
6. Quench.
7. Reheat to 250-500 deg.F. (in accordance with the necessities of the case)
and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment H

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,600 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 600-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment K

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,550 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 1,300-1,400 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 600-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment L

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize between 1,600 deg.F. and 1,750 deg.F. (1,650-1,700 deg.F. desired).
2. Cool slowly in the carbonizing mixture.
3. Reheat to 1,400-1,500 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 1,300-1,400 deg.F.
6. Quench.
7. Reheat to 250-500 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment M

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 500-1.250 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment P

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,450-1,500 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 1,375-1,450 deg.F. slowly.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 500-1,250 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment Q

After forging:
1. Heat to 1,475-1,525 deg.F. (Hold at this temperature one-half hour,
to insure thorough heating.)
2. Cool slowly.
3. Machine.
4. Reheat to 1,375-1,425 deg.F.
5. Quench.
6. Reheat to 250-550 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment R

After forging:
1. Heat to 1,500-1,550 deg.F.
2. Quench in oil.
3. Reheat to 1,200-1,300 deg.F. (Hold at this temperature three hours.)
4. Cool slowly.
5. Machine.
6. Reheat to 1,350-1,450 deg.F.
7. Quench in oil.
8. Reheat to 250-500 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment S

After forging or machining:
1. Carbonize at a temperature between 1,600 and 1,750 deg.F.
(1,650-1,700 deg.F. Desired.)
2. Cool slowly in the carbonizing mixture.
3. Reheat to 1,650-1,750 deg.F.
4. Quench.
5. Reheat to 1,475-1,550 deg.F.
6. Quench.
7. Reheat to 250-550 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment T

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,650-1,750 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 500-1,300 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment U

After forging:
1. Heat to 1,525-1,600 deg.F. (Hold for about one-half hour.)
2. Cool slowly.
3. Machine.
4. Reheat to 1,650-1,700 deg.F.
5. Quench.
6. Reheat to 350-550 deg.F. and cool slowly.

Heat Treatment V

After forging or machining:
1. Heat to 1,650-1,750 deg.F.
2. Quench.
3. Reheat to 400-1,200 deg.F. and cool slowly.





Next: Restoring Overheated Steel

Previous: Drop Forging Dies



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