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Steel Making

Carburizing Low-carbon Sleeves
Low-carbon sleeves are carburized and pushed on malleable-ir...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

Preparing Parts For Local Case-hardening
At the works of the Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, ...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Tool Or Crucible Steel
Crucible steel can be annealed either in muffled furnace or b...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Pyrometers
Armor plate makers sometimes use the copper ball or Siemens' ...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...



Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contraction
in hardening and are very desirable for test plugs, gages, punches
and dies, for milling cutters, taps, reamers, hard steel bushings
and similar work.

It is recommended that for forging these steels it be heated slowly
and uniformly to a bright red, but not in a direct flame or blast.
Harden at a dull red heat, about 1,300 deg.F. A clean coal or coke
fire, or a good muffle-gas furnace will give best results. Fish
oil is good for quenching although in some cases warm water will
give excellent results. The steel should be kept moving in the bath
until perfectly cold. Heated and cooled in this way the steel is
very tough, takes a good cutting edge and has very little expansion
or contraction which makes it desirable for long taps where the
accuracy of lead is important.

The composition of these steels is as follows:

Per cent
Manganese 1.40 to 1.60
Carbon 0.80 to 0.90
Vanadium 0.20 to 0.25





Next: Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel

Previous: Properties Of Alloy Steels



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