Steelmaking.ca Home Steel Making Categories Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Heat-treating Equipment And Methods For Mass Production
The heat-treating department of the Brown-Lipe-Chapin Company...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

High Speed Steel
For centuries the secret art of making tool steel was handed ...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

The Care Of Carburizing Compounds
Of all the opportunities for practicing economy in the heat-t...

High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel
High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing f...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...



Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contraction
in hardening and are very desirable for test plugs, gages, punches
and dies, for milling cutters, taps, reamers, hard steel bushings
and similar work.

It is recommended that for forging these steels it be heated slowly
and uniformly to a bright red, but not in a direct flame or blast.
Harden at a dull red heat, about 1,300 deg.F. A clean coal or coke
fire, or a good muffle-gas furnace will give best results. Fish
oil is good for quenching although in some cases warm water will
give excellent results. The steel should be kept moving in the bath
until perfectly cold. Heated and cooled in this way the steel is
very tough, takes a good cutting edge and has very little expansion
or contraction which makes it desirable for long taps where the
accuracy of lead is important.

The composition of these steels is as follows:

Per cent
Manganese 1.40 to 1.60
Carbon 0.80 to 0.90
Vanadium 0.20 to 0.25





Next: Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel

Previous: Properties Of Alloy Steels



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 10176