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The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Steel Can Be Worked Cold
As noted above, steel can be worked cold, as in the case of ...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Placing The Thermo-couples
The following illustrations from the Taylor Instrument Compan...

Lathe And Planer Tools
TO FORGE.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill is parti...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

The Care Of Carburizing Compounds
Of all the opportunities for practicing economy in the heat-t...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...



Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contraction
in hardening and are very desirable for test plugs, gages, punches
and dies, for milling cutters, taps, reamers, hard steel bushings
and similar work.

It is recommended that for forging these steels it be heated slowly
and uniformly to a bright red, but not in a direct flame or blast.
Harden at a dull red heat, about 1,300 deg.F. A clean coal or coke
fire, or a good muffle-gas furnace will give best results. Fish
oil is good for quenching although in some cases warm water will
give excellent results. The steel should be kept moving in the bath
until perfectly cold. Heated and cooled in this way the steel is
very tough, takes a good cutting edge and has very little expansion
or contraction which makes it desirable for long taps where the
accuracy of lead is important.

The composition of these steels is as follows:

Per cent
Manganese 1.40 to 1.60
Carbon 0.80 to 0.90
Vanadium 0.20 to 0.25





Next: Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel

Previous: Properties Of Alloy Steels



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