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Steel Making

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Testing And Inspection Of Heat Treatment
The hard parts of the gear must be so hard that a new mill f...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...

Protectors For Thermo-couples
Thermo-couples must be protected from the danger of mechanica...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...



Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contraction
in hardening and are very desirable for test plugs, gages, punches
and dies, for milling cutters, taps, reamers, hard steel bushings
and similar work.

It is recommended that for forging these steels it be heated slowly
and uniformly to a bright red, but not in a direct flame or blast.
Harden at a dull red heat, about 1,300 deg.F. A clean coal or coke
fire, or a good muffle-gas furnace will give best results. Fish
oil is good for quenching although in some cases warm water will
give excellent results. The steel should be kept moving in the bath
until perfectly cold. Heated and cooled in this way the steel is
very tough, takes a good cutting edge and has very little expansion
or contraction which makes it desirable for long taps where the
accuracy of lead is important.

The composition of these steels is as follows:

Per cent
Manganese 1.40 to 1.60
Carbon 0.80 to 0.90
Vanadium 0.20 to 0.25





Next: Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel

Previous: Properties Of Alloy Steels



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