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Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...

Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Shrinking And Enlarging Work
Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

Optical System And Electrical Circuit Of The Leeds & Northrup Optical Pyrometer
For extremely high temperature, the optical pyrometer is lar...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

For Milling Cutters And Formed Tools
FORGING.--Forge as before.--ANNEALING.--Place the steel in a ...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...



Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contraction
in hardening and are very desirable for test plugs, gages, punches
and dies, for milling cutters, taps, reamers, hard steel bushings
and similar work.

It is recommended that for forging these steels it be heated slowly
and uniformly to a bright red, but not in a direct flame or blast.
Harden at a dull red heat, about 1,300 deg.F. A clean coal or coke
fire, or a good muffle-gas furnace will give best results. Fish
oil is good for quenching although in some cases warm water will
give excellent results. The steel should be kept moving in the bath
until perfectly cold. Heated and cooled in this way the steel is
very tough, takes a good cutting edge and has very little expansion
or contraction which makes it desirable for long taps where the
accuracy of lead is important.

The composition of these steels is as follows:

Per cent
Manganese 1.40 to 1.60
Carbon 0.80 to 0.90
Vanadium 0.20 to 0.25





Next: Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel

Previous: Properties Of Alloy Steels



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