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Steel Making

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

The Thermo-couple
With the application of the thermo-couple, the measurement of...

Lathe And Planer Tools
TO FORGE.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill is parti...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

For Milling Cutters And Formed Tools
FORGING.--Forge as before.--ANNEALING.--Place the steel in a ...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

Optical System And Electrical Circuit Of The Leeds & Northrup Optical Pyrometer
For extremely high temperature, the optical pyrometer is lar...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Forging High-speed Steel
Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800 to 2,000 deg.F....

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Heat Treatment Of Milling Cutters Drills Reamers Etc
THE FIRE.--Gas and electric furnaces designed for high heats ...



High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing from
11 to 14 per cent chromium, was originally developed for cutlery
purposes, but has in the past few years been used to a considerable
extent for exhaust valves in airplane engines because of its resistance
to scaling at high temperatures.

Percentage
Carbon 0.20 to 0.40
Manganese, not to exceed 0.50
Phosphorus, not to exceed 0.035
Sulphur, not to exceed 0.035
Chromium 11.50 to 14.00
Silicon, not to exceed 0.30

The steel should be heated slowly and forged at a temperature above
1,750 deg.F. preferably between 1,800 and 2,200 deg.F. If forged at temperatures
between 1,650 and 1,750 deg.F. there is considerable danger of rupturing
the steel because of its hardness at red heat. Owing to the
air-hardening property of the steel, the drop-forgings should be
trimmed while hot. Thin forgings should be reheated to redness
before trimming, as otherwise they are liable to crack.

The forgings will be hard if they are allowed to cool in air. This
hardness varies over a range of from 250 to 500 Brinell, depending
on the original forging temperature.





Next: Annealing

Previous: Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel



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