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Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Lathe And Planer Tools
FORGING.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill, is parti...

Introduction Of Carbon
The matter to which these notes are primarily directed is the...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Tempering Colors On Carbon Steels
Opinions differ as to the temperature which is indicated by t...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Sulphur
Sulphur is another impurity and high sulphur is even a greate...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Calibration Of Pyrometer With Common Salt
An easy and convenient method for standardization and one whi...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...



High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing from
11 to 14 per cent chromium, was originally developed for cutlery
purposes, but has in the past few years been used to a considerable
extent for exhaust valves in airplane engines because of its resistance
to scaling at high temperatures.

Percentage
Carbon 0.20 to 0.40
Manganese, not to exceed 0.50
Phosphorus, not to exceed 0.035
Sulphur, not to exceed 0.035
Chromium 11.50 to 14.00
Silicon, not to exceed 0.30

The steel should be heated slowly and forged at a temperature above
1,750 deg.F. preferably between 1,800 and 2,200 deg.F. If forged at temperatures
between 1,650 and 1,750 deg.F. there is considerable danger of rupturing
the steel because of its hardness at red heat. Owing to the
air-hardening property of the steel, the drop-forgings should be
trimmed while hot. Thin forgings should be reheated to redness
before trimming, as otherwise they are liable to crack.

The forgings will be hard if they are allowed to cool in air. This
hardness varies over a range of from 250 to 500 Brinell, depending
on the original forging temperature.





Next: Annealing

Previous: Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel



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