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Steel Making

Lathe And Planer Tools
FORGING.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill, is parti...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

S A E Heat Treatments
The Society of Automotive Engineers have adopted certain heat...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Forging High-speed Steel
Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800 to 2,000 deg.F....

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Bessemer Process
The bessemer process consists of charging molten pig iron int...

Annealing
There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

Conclusions
Martien was probably never a serious contender for the honor ...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Complete Calibration Of Pyrometers
For the complete calibration of a thermo-couple of unknown e...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Detrimental Elements
Sulphur and phosphorus are two elements known to be detrimen...



Manganese






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is Mn. It
is somewhat more active than iron in many chemical changes--notably
it has what is apparently a stronger attraction for oxygen and
sulphur than has iron. Therefore the metal is used (especially in
the so-called basic process) to free the molten steel of oxygen,
acting in a manner similar to silicon, as explained above. The
compound of manganese and oxygen is readily eliminated from the
metal. Sufficient excess of elemental manganese should remain so
that the purchaser may be sure that the iron has been properly
deoxidized, and to render harmless the traces of sulphur present.
No damage is done by the presence of a little manganese in steel,
quite the reverse. Consequently it is common to find steels containing
from 0.3 to 1.5 per cent.





Next: Alloying Elements

Previous: Silicon



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