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Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

High Speed Steel
For centuries the secret art of making tool steel was handed ...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Plant For Forging Rifle Barrels
The forging of rifle barrels in large quantities and heat-tre...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Hints For Tool Steel Users
Do not hesitate to ask for information from the maker as to t...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Preventing Decarbonization Of Tool Steel
It is especially important to prevent decarbonization in such...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...



Manganese






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is Mn. It
is somewhat more active than iron in many chemical changes--notably
it has what is apparently a stronger attraction for oxygen and
sulphur than has iron. Therefore the metal is used (especially in
the so-called basic process) to free the molten steel of oxygen,
acting in a manner similar to silicon, as explained above. The
compound of manganese and oxygen is readily eliminated from the
metal. Sufficient excess of elemental manganese should remain so
that the purchaser may be sure that the iron has been properly
deoxidized, and to render harmless the traces of sulphur present.
No damage is done by the presence of a little manganese in steel,
quite the reverse. Consequently it is common to find steels containing
from 0.3 to 1.5 per cent.





Next: Alloying Elements

Previous: Silicon



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