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Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

The Penetration Of Carbon
Carburized mild steel is used to a great extent in the manufa...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

Standard Analysis
The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is t...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Application To The Automotive Industry
The information given on the various parts of the Liberty eng...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Conclusions
Martien was probably never a serious contender for the honor ...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...



Manganese






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is Mn. It
is somewhat more active than iron in many chemical changes--notably
it has what is apparently a stronger attraction for oxygen and
sulphur than has iron. Therefore the metal is used (especially in
the so-called basic process) to free the molten steel of oxygen,
acting in a manner similar to silicon, as explained above. The
compound of manganese and oxygen is readily eliminated from the
metal. Sufficient excess of elemental manganese should remain so
that the purchaser may be sure that the iron has been properly
deoxidized, and to render harmless the traces of sulphur present.
No damage is done by the presence of a little manganese in steel,
quite the reverse. Consequently it is common to find steels containing
from 0.3 to 1.5 per cent.





Next: Alloying Elements

Previous: Silicon



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