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Steel Making

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Protectors For Thermo-couples
Thermo-couples must be protected from the danger of mechanica...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

Placing The Thermo-couples
The following illustrations from the Taylor Instrument Compan...

The Leeds And Northrup Potentiometer System
The potentiometer pyrometer system is both flexible and subst...

High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel
High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing f...

Conclusions
Martien was probably never a serious contender for the honor ...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...



Manganese






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is Mn. It
is somewhat more active than iron in many chemical changes--notably
it has what is apparently a stronger attraction for oxygen and
sulphur than has iron. Therefore the metal is used (especially in
the so-called basic process) to free the molten steel of oxygen,
acting in a manner similar to silicon, as explained above. The
compound of manganese and oxygen is readily eliminated from the
metal. Sufficient excess of elemental manganese should remain so
that the purchaser may be sure that the iron has been properly
deoxidized, and to render harmless the traces of sulphur present.
No damage is done by the presence of a little manganese in steel,
quite the reverse. Consequently it is common to find steels containing
from 0.3 to 1.5 per cent.





Next: Alloying Elements

Previous: Silicon



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