VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.steelmaking.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
   Home - Steel Making - Categories - Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Open Hearth Process
The open hearth furnace consists of a big brick room with a l...

Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

The Care Of Carburizing Compounds
Of all the opportunities for practicing economy in the heat-t...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...



Oil-hardening Steel






Category: THE FORGING OF STEEL

Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and
forge thoroughly. Do not under any circumstances attempt to harden
at the forging heat. After cooling from forging reheat to about
1,450 deg.F. and cool slowly so as to remove forging strains.





Next: Chrome-nickel Steel

Previous: Carbon Tool Steel



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 4548