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Steel Making

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

Detrimental Elements
Sulphur and phosphorus are two elements known to be detrimen...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...



Oil-hardening Steel






Category: THE FORGING OF STEEL

Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and
forge thoroughly. Do not under any circumstances attempt to harden
at the forging heat. After cooling from forging reheat to about
1,450 deg.F. and cool slowly so as to remove forging strains.





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Previous: Carbon Tool Steel



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