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Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

The Leeds And Northrup Potentiometer System
The potentiometer pyrometer system is both flexible and subst...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Preventing Carburizing By Copper-plating
Copper-plating has been found effective and must have a thick...

Annealing Method
Forgings which are too hard to machine are put in pots with ...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...



Phosphorus






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal from
the ore. It remains in the steel when made by the so-called acid
process, but it can be easily eliminated down to 0.06 per cent
in the basic process. In fact the discovery of the basic process
was necessary before the huge iron deposits of Belgium and the
Franco-German border could be used. These ores contain several
per cent phosphorus, and made a very brittle steel (cold short)
until basic furnaces were used. Basic furnaces allow the formation
of a slag high in lime, which takes practically all the phosphorus
out of the metal. Not only is the resulting metal usable, but the
slag makes a very excellent fertilizer, and is in good demand.





Next: Silicon

Previous: Sulphur



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