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Steel Making

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

High Speed Steel
For centuries the secret art of making tool steel was handed ...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

Standard Analysis
The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is t...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Annealing Of High-speed Steel
For annealing high-speed steel, some makers recommend using g...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Carburizing Low-carbon Sleeves
Low-carbon sleeves are carburized and pushed on malleable-ir...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Detrimental Elements
Sulphur and phosphorus are two elements known to be detrimen...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...



High-carbon Machinery Steel






Category: ANNEALING

The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is hardly
ever above 60 points or 0.60 per cent. Annealing such steel is
generally in quantity production and does not require the care that
the other steels need because it is very largely a much cheaper
product and a great deal of material is generally removed from
the outside surface.

The purpose for which this steel is annealed is a deciding factor
as to what heat to give it. If it is for machineability only, the
steel requires to be brought up slowly to just below the critical and
then slowly cooled in the furnace or ash pit. It must be thoroughly
covered so that there will be no access of cool air. If the annealing
is to increase ductility to the maximum extent it should be slowly
heated to slightly over the upper critical temperature and kept at
this heat for a length of time necessary for a thorough penetration
to the core, after which it can be cooled to about 1,200 deg.F., then
reheated to about 1,360 deg.F., when it can be removed and put in an
ash pit or covered with lime. If the annealing is just to relieve
strains, slow heating is not necessary, but the steel must be brought
up to a temperature not much less than a forging or rolling heat
and gradually cooled. Covering in this case is only necessary in
steel of a carbon content of more than 40 points.





Next: Annealing In Bone

Previous: Annealing Alloy Steel



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