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Steel Making

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Annealing
ANNEALING can be done by heating to temperatures ranging from...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Properties Of Steel
Steels are known by certain tests. Early tests were more or l...

Annealing
There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

Steel Can Be Worked Cold
As noted above, steel can be worked cold, as in the case of ...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Optical System And Electrical Circuit Of The Leeds & Northrup Optical Pyrometer
For extremely high temperature, the optical pyrometer is lar...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Drop Forging Dies
The kind of steel used in the die of course influences the he...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Carburizing Low-carbon Sleeves
Low-carbon sleeves are carburized and pushed on malleable-ir...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...



High-carbon Machinery Steel






Category: ANNEALING

The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is hardly
ever above 60 points or 0.60 per cent. Annealing such steel is
generally in quantity production and does not require the care that
the other steels need because it is very largely a much cheaper
product and a great deal of material is generally removed from
the outside surface.

The purpose for which this steel is annealed is a deciding factor
as to what heat to give it. If it is for machineability only, the
steel requires to be brought up slowly to just below the critical and
then slowly cooled in the furnace or ash pit. It must be thoroughly
covered so that there will be no access of cool air. If the annealing
is to increase ductility to the maximum extent it should be slowly
heated to slightly over the upper critical temperature and kept at
this heat for a length of time necessary for a thorough penetration
to the core, after which it can be cooled to about 1,200 deg.F., then
reheated to about 1,360 deg.F., when it can be removed and put in an
ash pit or covered with lime. If the annealing is just to relieve
strains, slow heating is not necessary, but the steel must be brought
up to a temperature not much less than a forging or rolling heat
and gradually cooled. Covering in this case is only necessary in
steel of a carbon content of more than 40 points.





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