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Steel Making

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

The Packing Department
In Fig. 56 is shown the packing pots where the work is packe...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Standard Analysis
The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is t...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Testing And Inspection Of Heat Treatment
The hard parts of the gear must be so hard that a new mill f...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Preventing Carburizing By Copper-plating
Copper-plating has been found effective and must have a thick...

Drop Forging Dies
The kind of steel used in the die of course influences the he...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...



High-carbon Machinery Steel






Category: ANNEALING

The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is hardly
ever above 60 points or 0.60 per cent. Annealing such steel is
generally in quantity production and does not require the care that
the other steels need because it is very largely a much cheaper
product and a great deal of material is generally removed from
the outside surface.

The purpose for which this steel is annealed is a deciding factor
as to what heat to give it. If it is for machineability only, the
steel requires to be brought up slowly to just below the critical and
then slowly cooled in the furnace or ash pit. It must be thoroughly
covered so that there will be no access of cool air. If the annealing
is to increase ductility to the maximum extent it should be slowly
heated to slightly over the upper critical temperature and kept at
this heat for a length of time necessary for a thorough penetration
to the core, after which it can be cooled to about 1,200 deg.F., then
reheated to about 1,360 deg.F., when it can be removed and put in an
ash pit or covered with lime. If the annealing is just to relieve
strains, slow heating is not necessary, but the steel must be brought
up to a temperature not much less than a forging or rolling heat
and gradually cooled. Covering in this case is only necessary in
steel of a carbon content of more than 40 points.





Next: Annealing In Bone

Previous: Annealing Alloy Steel



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