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Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

High Speed Steel
For centuries the secret art of making tool steel was handed ...

Open Hearth Process
The open hearth furnace consists of a big brick room with a l...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

S A E Heat Treatments
The Society of Automotive Engineers have adopted certain heat...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Heat-treating Equipment And Methods For Mass Production
The heat-treating department of the Brown-Lipe-Chapin Company...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Conclusions
Martien was probably never a serious contender for the honor ...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Annealing
ANNEALING can be done by heating to temperatures ranging from...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...



High-carbon Machinery Steel






Category: ANNEALING

The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is hardly
ever above 60 points or 0.60 per cent. Annealing such steel is
generally in quantity production and does not require the care that
the other steels need because it is very largely a much cheaper
product and a great deal of material is generally removed from
the outside surface.

The purpose for which this steel is annealed is a deciding factor
as to what heat to give it. If it is for machineability only, the
steel requires to be brought up slowly to just below the critical and
then slowly cooled in the furnace or ash pit. It must be thoroughly
covered so that there will be no access of cool air. If the annealing
is to increase ductility to the maximum extent it should be slowly
heated to slightly over the upper critical temperature and kept at
this heat for a length of time necessary for a thorough penetration
to the core, after which it can be cooled to about 1,200 deg.F., then
reheated to about 1,360 deg.F., when it can be removed and put in an
ash pit or covered with lime. If the annealing is just to relieve
strains, slow heating is not necessary, but the steel must be brought
up to a temperature not much less than a forging or rolling heat
and gradually cooled. Covering in this case is only necessary in
steel of a carbon content of more than 40 points.





Next: Annealing In Bone

Previous: Annealing Alloy Steel



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