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Open Hearth Process
The open hearth furnace consists of a big brick room with a l...

Heat Treatment Of Punches And Dies Shears Taps Etc
HEATING.--The degree to which tools of the above classes shou...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Lathe And Planer Tools
FORGING.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill, is parti...

Annealing
There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

Steel Can Be Worked Cold
As noted above, steel can be worked cold, as in the case of ...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...

The Care Of Carburizing Compounds
Of all the opportunities for practicing economy in the heat-t...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Hardening Operation
Hardening a gear is accomplished as follows: The gear is tak...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...



High-carbon Machinery Steel






Category: ANNEALING

The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is hardly
ever above 60 points or 0.60 per cent. Annealing such steel is
generally in quantity production and does not require the care that
the other steels need because it is very largely a much cheaper
product and a great deal of material is generally removed from
the outside surface.

The purpose for which this steel is annealed is a deciding factor
as to what heat to give it. If it is for machineability only, the
steel requires to be brought up slowly to just below the critical and
then slowly cooled in the furnace or ash pit. It must be thoroughly
covered so that there will be no access of cool air. If the annealing
is to increase ductility to the maximum extent it should be slowly
heated to slightly over the upper critical temperature and kept at
this heat for a length of time necessary for a thorough penetration
to the core, after which it can be cooled to about 1,200 deg.F., then
reheated to about 1,360 deg.F., when it can be removed and put in an
ash pit or covered with lime. If the annealing is just to relieve
strains, slow heating is not necessary, but the steel must be brought
up to a temperature not much less than a forging or rolling heat
and gradually cooled. Covering in this case is only necessary in
steel of a carbon content of more than 40 points.





Next: Annealing In Bone

Previous: Annealing Alloy Steel



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