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Steel Making

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Machineability
Reheating for machine ability was done at 100 deg. less than ...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Carbon Tool Steel
Heat to a bright red, about 1,500 to 1,550 deg.F. Do not ham...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Sulphur
Sulphur is another impurity and high sulphur is even a greate...

Annealing
There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Heat Treatment Of Milling Cutters Drills Reamers Etc
THE FIRE.--Gas and electric furnaces designed for high heats ...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

Annealing Method
Forgings which are too hard to machine are put in pots with ...



Judging The Heat Of Steel






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to have
accurate knowledge as to the heat being used in either forging or
hardening steels, a color chart will be of considerable assistance
if carefully studied. These have been prepared by several of the
steel companies as a guide, but it must be remembered that the colors
and temperatures given are only approximate, and can be nothing
else.


The Magnet Test.--The critical point can also be determined by
an ordinary horse-shoe magnet. Touch the steel with a magnet during
the heating and when it reaches the temperature at which steel fails
to attract the magnet, or in other words, loses its magnetism,
the critical point has been reached.

The work is heated up slowly in the furnace and the magnet applied
from time to time. The steel being heated will attract the magnet
until the heat reaches the critical point. The magnet is applied
frequently and when the magnet is no longer attracted, the piece
is at the lowest temperature at which it can be hardened properly.
Quenching slightly above this point will give a tool of satisfactory
hardness. The method applies only to carbon steels and will not
work for modern high-speed steels.





Next: Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks

Previous: Hardening



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