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Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Calibration Of Pyrometer With Common Salt
An easy and convenient method for standardization and one whi...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

Conclusions
Martien was probably never a serious contender for the honor ...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Pyrometers
Armor plate makers sometimes use the copper ball or Siemens' ...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

The Care Of Carburizing Compounds
Of all the opportunities for practicing economy in the heat-t...

High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel
High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing f...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...



Short Method Of Treatment






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

In the new method, the packed pots are
run into the case-hardening furnaces, which are heated to 1,600 deg.F.
On the insertion of the cold pots, the temperature naturally falls.
The amount of this fall is dependent upon a number of variables,
but it averages nearly 500 deg.F. as shown in the pyrometer chart,
Fig. 61. The work and furnace must be brought to 1,600 deg.F. Within
2-1/2 hr.; otherwise, a longer time will be necessary to obtain
the desired depth of case. On this work, the depth of case required
is designated in thousandths, and on crown gears, the depth in
0.028 in. Having brought the work to a temperature of 1,600 deg.F.
the depth of case mentioned can be obtained in about 5-1/2 hr. by
maintaining this temperature.

As stated before, at the top of each pot are several test pieces
consisting of a whole scrap gear and several sections. After the
pots have been heated at 1,600 deg.F. for about 5-1/4 hr., they are
removed, and a scrap-section test-piece is quenched direct from
the pot in mineral oil at not more than 100 deg.F. The end of a tooth
of this is then ground and etched to ascertain the depth of case.
As these test pieces are of exactly the same cross-section as the
gears themselves, the carburizing action is similar. When the depth
of case has been found from the etched test pieces to be satisfactory,
the pots are removed. The iron ball then is dropped into the tube
to seal the hole in the bottom of the pot; the cover and the tube
are removed, and the gears quenched direct from the pot in mineral
oil, which is kept at a temperature not higher than 100 deg.F.





Next: The Effect

Previous: The Packing Department



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