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Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

S A E Heat Treatments
The Society of Automotive Engineers have adopted certain heat...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

Testing And Inspection Of Heat Treatment
The hard parts of the gear must be so hard that a new mill f...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

Pyrometry And Pyrometers
A knowledge of the fundamental principles of pyrometry, or th...

Short Method Of Treatment
In the new method, the packed pots are run into the case-har...

Protectors For Thermo-couples
Thermo-couples must be protected from the danger of mechanica...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...



Short Method Of Treatment






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

In the new method, the packed pots are
run into the case-hardening furnaces, which are heated to 1,600 deg.F.
On the insertion of the cold pots, the temperature naturally falls.
The amount of this fall is dependent upon a number of variables,
but it averages nearly 500 deg.F. as shown in the pyrometer chart,
Fig. 61. The work and furnace must be brought to 1,600 deg.F. Within
2-1/2 hr.; otherwise, a longer time will be necessary to obtain
the desired depth of case. On this work, the depth of case required
is designated in thousandths, and on crown gears, the depth in
0.028 in. Having brought the work to a temperature of 1,600 deg.F.
the depth of case mentioned can be obtained in about 5-1/2 hr. by
maintaining this temperature.

As stated before, at the top of each pot are several test pieces
consisting of a whole scrap gear and several sections. After the
pots have been heated at 1,600 deg.F. for about 5-1/4 hr., they are
removed, and a scrap-section test-piece is quenched direct from
the pot in mineral oil at not more than 100 deg.F. The end of a tooth
of this is then ground and etched to ascertain the depth of case.
As these test pieces are of exactly the same cross-section as the
gears themselves, the carburizing action is similar. When the depth
of case has been found from the etched test pieces to be satisfactory,
the pots are removed. The iron ball then is dropped into the tube
to seal the hole in the bottom of the pot; the cover and the tube
are removed, and the gears quenched direct from the pot in mineral
oil, which is kept at a temperature not higher than 100 deg.F.





Next: The Effect

Previous: The Packing Department



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