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Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Conclusions
Martien was probably never a serious contender for the honor ...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Preventing Carburizing By Copper-plating
Copper-plating has been found effective and must have a thick...

Tempering Colors On Carbon Steels
Opinions differ as to the temperature which is indicated by t...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Annealing Of High-speed Steel
For annealing high-speed steel, some makers recommend using g...

The Forging Of Steel
So much depends upon the forging of steel that this operation...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

For Milling Cutters And Formed Tools
FORGING.--Forge as before.--ANNEALING.--Place the steel in a ...

Heat Treatment Of Lathe Planer And Similar Tools
FIRE.--For these tools a good fire is one made of hard foundr...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...



Short Method Of Treatment






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

In the new method, the packed pots are
run into the case-hardening furnaces, which are heated to 1,600 deg.F.
On the insertion of the cold pots, the temperature naturally falls.
The amount of this fall is dependent upon a number of variables,
but it averages nearly 500 deg.F. as shown in the pyrometer chart,
Fig. 61. The work and furnace must be brought to 1,600 deg.F. Within
2-1/2 hr.; otherwise, a longer time will be necessary to obtain
the desired depth of case. On this work, the depth of case required
is designated in thousandths, and on crown gears, the depth in
0.028 in. Having brought the work to a temperature of 1,600 deg.F.
the depth of case mentioned can be obtained in about 5-1/2 hr. by
maintaining this temperature.

As stated before, at the top of each pot are several test pieces
consisting of a whole scrap gear and several sections. After the
pots have been heated at 1,600 deg.F. for about 5-1/4 hr., they are
removed, and a scrap-section test-piece is quenched direct from
the pot in mineral oil at not more than 100 deg.F. The end of a tooth
of this is then ground and etched to ascertain the depth of case.
As these test pieces are of exactly the same cross-section as the
gears themselves, the carburizing action is similar. When the depth
of case has been found from the etched test pieces to be satisfactory,
the pots are removed. The iron ball then is dropped into the tube
to seal the hole in the bottom of the pot; the cover and the tube
are removed, and the gears quenched direct from the pot in mineral
oil, which is kept at a temperature not higher than 100 deg.F.





Next: The Effect

Previous: The Packing Department



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