Steelmaking.ca Home Steel Making Categories Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Drop Forging Dies
The kind of steel used in the die of course influences the he...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

The Forging Of Steel
So much depends upon the forging of steel that this operation...

Nickel-chromium
A combination of the characteristics of nickel and the charac...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...



Pyrometers For Molten Metal






Category: PYROMETRY AND PYROMETERS

Pyrometers for molten metal are connected to portable thermocouples
as in Fig. 132. Usually the pyrometer is portable, as shown in
this case, which is a Brown. Other methods of mounting for this
kind of work arc shown in Figs. 133 and 134. The bent mountings
are designed for molten metal, such as brass or copper and are
supplied with either clay, graphite or carborundum tubes. Fifteen
feet of connecting wire is usually supplied.

The angle mountings, Fig. 134, are recommended for baths such as
lead or cyanide. The horizontal arm is usually about 14 in. long,
and the whole mounting is easily taken apart making replacements
very easy. Details of the thermo-couple shown in Fig. 132 are given
in Fig. 135. This is a straight rod with a protector for the hand
of the operator. The lag in such couples is less than one minute.
These are Englehard mountings.





Next: Protectors For Thermo-couples

Previous: An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 4658