VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.steelmaking.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
   Home - Steel Making - Categories - Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Hardening Operation
Hardening a gear is accomplished as follows: The gear is tak...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel
High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing f...

Machineability
Reheating for machine ability was done at 100 deg. less than ...



Standard Analysis






Category: HIGH-SPEED STEEL

The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is the
result of a series of compromises between various properties imparted
to the steel by the addition of different elements and there is a
wide range of chemical analyses of various brands. The steel, to
be within the range of generally accepted analysis, should contain
over 16 per cent and under 20 per cent tungsten; if of lower tungsten
content it should carry proportionately more chromium and vanadium.

The combined action of tungsten and chromium in steel gives to it the
remarkable property of maintaining its cutting edge at relatively high
temperature. This property is commonly spoken of as red-hardness.
The percentages of tungsten and chromium present should bear a
definite relationship to each other. Chromium imparts to steel
a hardening property similar to that given by carbon, although
to a less degree. The hardness imparted to steel by chromium is
accompanied by brittleness. The chromium content should be between
3.5 and 5 per cent.

Vanadium was first introduced in high-speed steel as a scavenger,
thereby producing a more homogeneous product, of greater density
and physical strength. It soon became evident that vanadium used
in larger quantities than necessary as a scavenger imparted to
the steel a much greater cutting efficiency. Recently, no less an
authority than Prof. J. O. Arnold, of the University of Sheffield,
England, stated that high-speed steels containing vanadium have
a mean efficiency of 108.9, as against a mean efficiency of 61.9
obtained from those without vanadium content. A wide range of
vanadium content in steel, from 0.5 to 1.5 per cent, is permissible.

An ideal analysis for high-speed steel containing 18 per cent tungsten
is a chromium content of approximately 3.85 per cent; vanadium, 0.85
to 1.10 per cent, and carbon, between 0.62 and 0.77 per cent.





Next: Detrimental Elements

Previous: High Speed Steel



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 4319