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Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Optical System And Electrical Circuit Of The Leeds & Northrup Optical Pyrometer
For extremely high temperature, the optical pyrometer is lar...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Forging High-speed Steel
Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800 to 2,000 deg.F....

Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Testing And Inspection Of Heat Treatment
The hard parts of the gear must be so hard that a new mill f...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

Shrinking And Enlarging Work
Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling...

Introduction Of Carbon
The matter to which these notes are primarily directed is the...



Separating The Work From The Compound






Category: CASE-HARDENING OR SURFACE-CARBURIZING

During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a cast-iron
screen which forms a table or apron for the furnace. Directly beneath
this table is located one of the steel conveyor carts, shown in Fig.
43, which is provided with two wheels at the rear and a dolly clevis
at the front, which allows it to be hauled away from beneath the
furnace apron while filled with red-hot compound. A steel cover is
provided for each box, and the material is allowed to cool without
losing much of the evolved gases which are still being thrown off
by the compound.




As this compound comes from the carburizing pots it contains bits
of fireclay which represent a part of the luting used for sealing,
and there may be small parts of work or bits of fused material
in it as well. After cooling, the compound is very dusty and
disagreeable to handle, and, before it can be used again, must be
sifted, cleaned and blended.

Some time ago the writer was confronted with this proposition for
one of the largest consumers of carburizing compound in the world,
and the problem was handled in the following manner: The cooled
compound was dumped from the cooling cars and sprinkled with a
low-grade oil which served the dual purposes of settling the dust
and adding a certain percentage of valuable hydrocarbon to the
compound. In Fig. 44 is shown the machine that was designed to do
the cleaning and blending.





Next: Blending The Compound

Previous: The Care Of Carburizing Compounds



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