Steelmaking.ca Home Steel Making Categories Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Machineability
Reheating for machine ability was done at 100 deg. less than ...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Annealing Of High-speed Steel
For annealing high-speed steel, some makers recommend using g...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

Calibration Of Pyrometer With Common Salt
An easy and convenient method for standardization and one whi...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Heat Treatment Of Milling Cutters Drills Reamers Etc
THE FIRE.--Gas and electric furnaces designed for high heats ...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...



Sulphur






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found in
steel in small quantities. Some sulphur is contained in the ore
from which the iron is smelted; more sulphur is introduced by the
coke and fuel used. Sulphur is very difficult to get rid of in
steel making; in fact the resulting metal usually contains a little
more than the raw materials used. Only the electric furnace is
able to produce the necessary heat and slags required to eliminate
sulphur, and as a matter of fact the sulphur does not go until
several other impurities have been eliminated. Consequently, an
electric steel with extremely low sulphur (0.02 per cent) is by
that same token a well-made metal.

Sulphur is of most trouble to rolling and forging operations when
conducted at a red heat. It makes steel tender and brittle at that
temperature--a condition known to the workmen as red-short. It
seems to have little or no effect upon the physical properties
of cold steel--at least as revealed by the ordinary testing
machines--consequently many specifications do not set any limit
on sulphur, resting on the idea that if sulphur is low enough not
to cause trouble to the manufacturer during rolling, it will not
cause the user any trouble.

Tool steel and other fine steels should be very low in sulphur,
preferably not higher than 0.03 per cent. Higher sulphur steels
(0.06 per cent, and even up to 0.10 per cent) have given very good
service for machine parts, but in general a high sulphur steel
is a suspicious steel. Screw stock is purposely made with up to
0.12 per cent sulphur and a like amount of phosphorus so it will
cut freely.

Manganese counteracts the detrimental effect of sulphur when present
in the steel to an amount at least five times the sulphur content.





Next: Phosphorus

Previous: Composition And Properties Of Steel



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 11306