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Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

Introduction Of Carbon
The matter to which these notes are primarily directed is the...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

The Care Of Carburizing Compounds
Of all the opportunities for practicing economy in the heat-t...

Tempering Colors On Carbon Steels
Opinions differ as to the temperature which is indicated by t...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Steel Can Be Worked Cold
As noted above, steel can be worked cold, as in the case of ...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...



Temperature For Annealing






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

Theoretically, annealing should be
accomplished at a temperature at just slightly above the critical
point. However, in practice the temperature is raised to a higher
point in order to allow for the solution of the carbon and iron to
be produced more rapidly, as the time required to produce complete
solution is reduced as the temperature increases past the critical
point.

For annealing the simpler types of low-carbon steels the following
temperatures have been found to produce uniform machining conditions
on account of producing uniform fine-grain pearlite structure:

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, straight carbon steel.--Heat to 1,650 deg.F.
Hold at this temperature until the work is uniformly heated; pull
from the furnace and cool in air.

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, 1-1/2 per cent nickel, 1/2 per cent
chromium steel.--Heat to 1,600 deg.F. Hold at this temperature until
the work is uniformly heated; pull from the furnace and cool in air.

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, 3-1/2 per cent nickel steel.--Heat
to 1,575 deg.F. Hold at this temperature until the work is uniformly
heated; pull from the furnace and cool in air.





Next: Care In Annealing

Previous: Effects Of Proper Annealing



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