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The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Pyrometers For Molten Metal
Pyrometers for molten metal are connected to portable thermoc...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Lathe And Planer Tools
FORGING.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill, is parti...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Placing The Thermo-couples
The following illustrations from the Taylor Instrument Compan...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Drop Forging Dies
The kind of steel used in the die of course influences the he...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...



Temperature For Annealing






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

Theoretically, annealing should be
accomplished at a temperature at just slightly above the critical
point. However, in practice the temperature is raised to a higher
point in order to allow for the solution of the carbon and iron to
be produced more rapidly, as the time required to produce complete
solution is reduced as the temperature increases past the critical
point.

For annealing the simpler types of low-carbon steels the following
temperatures have been found to produce uniform machining conditions
on account of producing uniform fine-grain pearlite structure:

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, straight carbon steel.--Heat to 1,650 deg.F.
Hold at this temperature until the work is uniformly heated; pull
from the furnace and cool in air.

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, 1-1/2 per cent nickel, 1/2 per cent
chromium steel.--Heat to 1,600 deg.F. Hold at this temperature until
the work is uniformly heated; pull from the furnace and cool in air.

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, 3-1/2 per cent nickel steel.--Heat
to 1,575 deg.F. Hold at this temperature until the work is uniformly
heated; pull from the furnace and cool in air.





Next: Care In Annealing

Previous: Effects Of Proper Annealing



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