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Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel
High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing f...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Heat Treatment Of Punches And Dies Shears Taps Etc
HEATING.--The degree to which tools of the above classes shou...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...



Temperature For Annealing






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

Theoretically, annealing should be
accomplished at a temperature at just slightly above the critical
point. However, in practice the temperature is raised to a higher
point in order to allow for the solution of the carbon and iron to
be produced more rapidly, as the time required to produce complete
solution is reduced as the temperature increases past the critical
point.

For annealing the simpler types of low-carbon steels the following
temperatures have been found to produce uniform machining conditions
on account of producing uniform fine-grain pearlite structure:

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, straight carbon steel.--Heat to 1,650 deg.F.
Hold at this temperature until the work is uniformly heated; pull
from the furnace and cool in air.

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, 1-1/2 per cent nickel, 1/2 per cent
chromium steel.--Heat to 1,600 deg.F. Hold at this temperature until
the work is uniformly heated; pull from the furnace and cool in air.

0.15 to 0.25 per cent carbon, 3-1/2 per cent nickel steel.--Heat
to 1,575 deg.F. Hold at this temperature until the work is uniformly
heated; pull from the furnace and cool in air.





Next: Care In Annealing

Previous: Effects Of Proper Annealing



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