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Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Steel Can Be Worked Cold
As noted above, steel can be worked cold, as in the case of ...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Open Hearth Process
The open hearth furnace consists of a big brick room with a l...

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

Refining The Grain
This is remedied by reheating the piece to a temperature slig...

Introduction Of Carbon
The matter to which these notes are primarily directed is the...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Annealing
ANNEALING can be done by heating to temperatures ranging from...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...



Tempering Round Dies






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in tool
holders of turret lathes were required. No proper tempering oven
was available, so the following method was adopted and proved quite
successful.

After the dies had been hardened dead hard in water, they were
cleaned up bright. A pair of ordinary smiths' tongs was made with
jaws of heavy material and to fit nicely all around the outside of
the die, leaving a 3/32-in. space when the jaws were closed around
the die. The dies being all ready, the tongs were heated red hot, and
the dies were picked up and held by the tongs. This tempered them
from the outside in, left the teeth the temper required and the
outside slightly softer. The dies held up the work successfully
and were better than when tempered in the same bath.





Next: The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages

Previous: Shrinking And Enlarging Work



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