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Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Bessemer Process
The bessemer process consists of charging molten pig iron int...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

Annealing
ANNEALING can be done by heating to temperatures ranging from...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Carburizing Low-carbon Sleeves
Low-carbon sleeves are carburized and pushed on malleable-ir...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...



Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels






Category: HIGH-SPEED STEEL

The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are given
by a maker whose steel is probably typical of a number of different
makes, so that they will be found useful in other cases as well.
These include hints as to forging as well as hardening, together
with a list of dont's which are often very useful. This applies
to forging, hardening of lathe, slotting, planing and all similar
tools.


and larger is usually mild finished, and can be cut in a hack saw.
If cut off hot, be sure to heat the butt end slowly and thoroughly
in a clean fire. Rapid and insufficient heating invariably cracks
the steel. If you want to stamp the end with the name of the steel,
it is necessary that this is done at a good high orange color heat,
as it is otherwise apt to split the steel. (Take your time, do
not hurry.)]





Next: Hardening High-speed Steel

Previous: A Chromium-cobalt Steel



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