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Steel Making

The Thermo-couple
With the application of the thermo-couple, the measurement of...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Heat Treatment Of Milling Cutters Drills Reamers Etc
THE FIRE.--Gas and electric furnaces designed for high heats ...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Pyrometers
Armor plate makers sometimes use the copper ball or Siemens' ...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...



Shrinking And Enlarging Work






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling.
Pins for forced fits can be enlarged several thousandths of an
inch by rapid heating to a dull red and quenching in water. The
theory is that the metal is expanded in heating and that the sudden
cooling sets the outer portion before the core can contract. In
dipping the piece is not held under water till cold but is dipped,
held a moment and removed. Then dipped again and again until cold.

Rings and drawing dies are also shrunk in a similar way. The rings
are slowly heated to a cherry red, slipped on a rod and rolled
in a shallow pan of water which cools only the outer edge. This
holds the outside while the inner heated portion is forced inward,
reducing the hole. This operation can be repeated a number of times
with considerable success.





Next: Tempering Round Dies

Previous: Preventing Cracks In Hardening



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