Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 
   Home - Steel Making - Categories - Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

The Penetration Of Carbon
Carburized mild steel is used to a great extent in the manufa...

Testing And Inspection Of Heat Treatment
The hard parts of the gear must be so hard that a new mill f...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...



Shrinking And Enlarging Work






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling.
Pins for forced fits can be enlarged several thousandths of an
inch by rapid heating to a dull red and quenching in water. The
theory is that the metal is expanded in heating and that the sudden
cooling sets the outer portion before the core can contract. In
dipping the piece is not held under water till cold but is dipped,
held a moment and removed. Then dipped again and again until cold.

Rings and drawing dies are also shrunk in a similar way. The rings
are slowly heated to a cherry red, slipped on a rod and rolled
in a shallow pan of water which cools only the outer edge. This
holds the outside while the inner heated portion is forced inward,
reducing the hole. This operation can be repeated a number of times
with considerable success.





Next: Tempering Round Dies

Previous: Preventing Cracks In Hardening



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 4101