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Steel Making

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

The Forging Of Steel
So much depends upon the forging of steel that this operation...

Complete Calibration Of Pyrometers
For the complete calibration of a thermo-couple of unknown e...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

Tool Or Crucible Steel
Crucible steel can be annealed either in muffled furnace or b...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Pyrometers
Armor plate makers sometimes use the copper ball or Siemens' ...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...



Shrinking And Enlarging Work






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling.
Pins for forced fits can be enlarged several thousandths of an
inch by rapid heating to a dull red and quenching in water. The
theory is that the metal is expanded in heating and that the sudden
cooling sets the outer portion before the core can contract. In
dipping the piece is not held under water till cold but is dipped,
held a moment and removed. Then dipped again and again until cold.

Rings and drawing dies are also shrunk in a similar way. The rings
are slowly heated to a cherry red, slipped on a rod and rolled
in a shallow pan of water which cools only the outer edge. This
holds the outside while the inner heated portion is forced inward,
reducing the hole. This operation can be repeated a number of times
with considerable success.





Next: Tempering Round Dies

Previous: Preventing Cracks In Hardening



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