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Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Annealing Of High-speed Steel
For annealing high-speed steel, some makers recommend using g...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Properties Of Steel
Steels are known by certain tests. Early tests were more or l...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Temperature For Annealing
Theoretically, annealing should be accomplished at a tempera...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...



Heat-treating Department






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

The heat-treating department occupies an
L-shaped building. The design is very practical, with the furnace
and the floor on the same level so that there is no lifting of
heavy pots. Fuel oil is used in all the furnaces and gives highly
satisfactory results. The consumption of fuel oil is about 2 gal.
per hour per furnace.

The work is packed in the pots in a room at the entrance to the
heat-treatment building. Before packing, each gear is stamped with
a number which is a key to the records of the analysis and complete
heat treatment of that particular gear. Should a question at any time
arise regarding the treatment of a certain gear, all the necessary
information is available if the number on the gear is legible. For
instance, date of treatment, furnace, carburizing material, position
of the pot in the furnace, position of gear in pot, temperature of
furnace and duration of treatment are all tabulated and filed for
reference.

After marking, all holes and parts which are to remain uncarburized
are plugged or luted with a mixture of kaolin and Mellville gravel
clay, and the gear is packed in the carburizing material. Bohnite,
a commercial carburizing compound is used exclusively at this plant.
This does excellent work and is economical. Broadly speaking, the
economy of a carburizing compound depends on its lightness. The
space not occupied by work must be filled with compound; therefore)
other things being equal, a compound weighing 25 lb. would be worth
more than twice as much as one weighing 60 lb. per cubic foot. It
has been claimed that certain compounds can be used over and over
again, but this is only true in a limited way, if good work is
required. There is, of course, some carbon in the compound after
the first use, but for first-class work, new compound must be used
each time.





Next: The Packing Department

Previous: Annealing Method



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