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Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

The Electric Process
The fourth method of manufacturing steel is by the electric f...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

For Milling Cutters And Formed Tools
FORGING.--Forge as before.--ANNEALING.--Place the steel in a ...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Sulphur
Sulphur is another impurity and high sulphur is even a greate...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Forging High-speed Steel
Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800 to 2,000 deg.F....

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...



Carbon Steels For Different Tools






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

All users of tool steels should carefully study the different qualities
of the steels they handle. Different uses requires different kinds of
steel for best results, and for the purpose of designating different
steels some makers have adopted the two terms temper, and quality,
to distinguish between them.

In this case temper refers to the amount of carbon which is combined
with the iron to make the metal into a steel. The quality means
the absence of phosphorous, sulphur and other impurities, these
depending on the ores and the methods of treatment.

Steel makers have various ways of designating carbon steels for
different purposes. Some of these systems involve the use of numbers,
that of the Latrobe Steel Company being given herewith. It will
be noted that the numbers are based on 20 points of carbon per
unit. The names given the different tempers are also of interest.
Other makers use different numbers.

The temper list follows:

LATROBE TEMPER LIST OF CARBON TOOL STEELS
No. 3 temper 0.60 to 0.69 per cent carbon
No. 3-1/2 temper 0.70 to 0.79 per cent carbon
No. 4 temper 0.80 to 0.89 per cent carbon
No. 4-1/2 temper 0.90 to 0.99 pet cent carbon
No. 5 temper 1.00 to 1.09 per cent carbon
No. 5-1/2 temper 1.10 to 1.19 per cent carbon
No. 6 temper 1.20 to 1.29 per cent carbon
No. 6-1/2 temper 1.30 to 1.39 per cent carbon
No. 7 temper 1.40 to 1.49 per cent carbon





Next: Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Carbon In Tool Steel



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