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Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

The Leeds And Northrup Potentiometer System
The potentiometer pyrometer system is both flexible and subst...

Pyrometry And Pyrometers
A knowledge of the fundamental principles of pyrometry, or th...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Plant For Forging Rifle Barrels
The forging of rifle barrels in large quantities and heat-tre...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Hints For Tool Steel Users
Do not hesitate to ask for information from the maker as to t...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Nickel-chromium
A combination of the characteristics of nickel and the charac...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Pyrometers
Armor plate makers sometimes use the copper ball or Siemens' ...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

The Packing Department
In Fig. 56 is shown the packing pots where the work is packe...

High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel
High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing f...



Carbon Steels For Different Tools






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

All users of tool steels should carefully study the different qualities
of the steels they handle. Different uses requires different kinds of
steel for best results, and for the purpose of designating different
steels some makers have adopted the two terms temper, and quality,
to distinguish between them.

In this case temper refers to the amount of carbon which is combined
with the iron to make the metal into a steel. The quality means
the absence of phosphorous, sulphur and other impurities, these
depending on the ores and the methods of treatment.

Steel makers have various ways of designating carbon steels for
different purposes. Some of these systems involve the use of numbers,
that of the Latrobe Steel Company being given herewith. It will
be noted that the numbers are based on 20 points of carbon per
unit. The names given the different tempers are also of interest.
Other makers use different numbers.

The temper list follows:

LATROBE TEMPER LIST OF CARBON TOOL STEELS
No. 3 temper 0.60 to 0.69 per cent carbon
No. 3-1/2 temper 0.70 to 0.79 per cent carbon
No. 4 temper 0.80 to 0.89 per cent carbon
No. 4-1/2 temper 0.90 to 0.99 pet cent carbon
No. 5 temper 1.00 to 1.09 per cent carbon
No. 5-1/2 temper 1.10 to 1.19 per cent carbon
No. 6 temper 1.20 to 1.29 per cent carbon
No. 6-1/2 temper 1.30 to 1.39 per cent carbon
No. 7 temper 1.40 to 1.49 per cent carbon





Next: Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Carbon In Tool Steel



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