Steelmaking.ca Home Steel Making Categories Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Sulphur
Sulphur is another impurity and high sulphur is even a greate...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...



Carbon Steels For Different Tools






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

All users of tool steels should carefully study the different qualities
of the steels they handle. Different uses requires different kinds of
steel for best results, and for the purpose of designating different
steels some makers have adopted the two terms temper, and quality,
to distinguish between them.

In this case temper refers to the amount of carbon which is combined
with the iron to make the metal into a steel. The quality means
the absence of phosphorous, sulphur and other impurities, these
depending on the ores and the methods of treatment.

Steel makers have various ways of designating carbon steels for
different purposes. Some of these systems involve the use of numbers,
that of the Latrobe Steel Company being given herewith. It will
be noted that the numbers are based on 20 points of carbon per
unit. The names given the different tempers are also of interest.
Other makers use different numbers.

The temper list follows:

LATROBE TEMPER LIST OF CARBON TOOL STEELS
No. 3 temper 0.60 to 0.69 per cent carbon
No. 3-1/2 temper 0.70 to 0.79 per cent carbon
No. 4 temper 0.80 to 0.89 per cent carbon
No. 4-1/2 temper 0.90 to 0.99 pet cent carbon
No. 5 temper 1.00 to 1.09 per cent carbon
No. 5-1/2 temper 1.10 to 1.19 per cent carbon
No. 6 temper 1.20 to 1.29 per cent carbon
No. 6-1/2 temper 1.30 to 1.39 per cent carbon
No. 7 temper 1.40 to 1.49 per cent carbon





Next: Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Carbon In Tool Steel



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 4658