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Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Properties Of Steel
Steels are known by certain tests. Early tests were more or l...

Pyrometers For Molten Metal
Pyrometers for molten metal are connected to portable thermoc...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Plant For Forging Rifle Barrels
The forging of rifle barrels in large quantities and heat-tre...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Bessemer Process
The bessemer process consists of charging molten pig iron int...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

The Leeds And Northrup Potentiometer System
The potentiometer pyrometer system is both flexible and subst...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

Lathe And Planer Tools
FORGING.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill, is parti...



Carbon Steels For Different Tools






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

All users of tool steels should carefully study the different qualities
of the steels they handle. Different uses requires different kinds of
steel for best results, and for the purpose of designating different
steels some makers have adopted the two terms temper, and quality,
to distinguish between them.

In this case temper refers to the amount of carbon which is combined
with the iron to make the metal into a steel. The quality means
the absence of phosphorous, sulphur and other impurities, these
depending on the ores and the methods of treatment.

Steel makers have various ways of designating carbon steels for
different purposes. Some of these systems involve the use of numbers,
that of the Latrobe Steel Company being given herewith. It will
be noted that the numbers are based on 20 points of carbon per
unit. The names given the different tempers are also of interest.
Other makers use different numbers.

The temper list follows:

LATROBE TEMPER LIST OF CARBON TOOL STEELS
No. 3 temper 0.60 to 0.69 per cent carbon
No. 3-1/2 temper 0.70 to 0.79 per cent carbon
No. 4 temper 0.80 to 0.89 per cent carbon
No. 4-1/2 temper 0.90 to 0.99 pet cent carbon
No. 5 temper 1.00 to 1.09 per cent carbon
No. 5-1/2 temper 1.10 to 1.19 per cent carbon
No. 6 temper 1.20 to 1.29 per cent carbon
No. 6-1/2 temper 1.30 to 1.39 per cent carbon
No. 7 temper 1.40 to 1.49 per cent carbon





Next: Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Carbon In Tool Steel



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