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Steel Making

The Electric Process
The fourth method of manufacturing steel is by the electric f...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Steel Can Be Worked Cold
As noted above, steel can be worked cold, as in the case of ...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...

The Care Of Carburizing Compounds
Of all the opportunities for practicing economy in the heat-t...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

For Milling Cutters And Formed Tools
FORGING.--Forge as before.--ANNEALING.--Place the steel in a ...



Annealing






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

ANNEALING can be done by heating to temperatures ranging from 1,290
to 1,380 deg.F. and cooling in air or quenching in water or oil. After
this treatment the forgings will have a hardness of about 200 Brinell
and a tensile strength of 100,000 to 112,000 lb. per square inch.
If softer forgings are desired they can be heated to a temperature
of from 1,560 to 1,650 deg.F. and cooled very slowly. Although softer
the forgings will not machine as smoothly as when annealed at the
lower temperature.





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