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Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...

Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Preventing Decarbonization Of Tool Steel
It is especially important to prevent decarbonization in such...

Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Short Method Of Treatment
In the new method, the packed pots are run into the case-har...

Forging High-speed Steel
Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800 to 2,000 deg.F....

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...



Annealing






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

ANNEALING can be done by heating to temperatures ranging from 1,290
to 1,380 deg.F. and cooling in air or quenching in water or oil. After
this treatment the forgings will have a hardness of about 200 Brinell
and a tensile strength of 100,000 to 112,000 lb. per square inch.
If softer forgings are desired they can be heated to a temperature
of from 1,560 to 1,650 deg.F. and cooled very slowly. Although softer
the forgings will not machine as smoothly as when annealed at the
lower temperature.





Next: Hardening

Previous: High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel



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