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The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Preventing Carburizing By Copper-plating
Copper-plating has been found effective and must have a thick...

Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Application To The Automotive Industry
The information given on the various parts of the Liberty eng...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

Tempering Colors On Carbon Steels
Opinions differ as to the temperature which is indicated by t...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Annealing
There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

S A E Heat Treatments
The Society of Automotive Engineers have adopted certain heat...



Carbon In Tool Steel






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, usually
contains from 80 to 125 points (or from 0.80 to 1.25 per cent)
of carbon, and none of the alloys which go to make up the high
speed steels. This was formerly known also as crucible or cast
steel, or crucible cast steel, from the way in which it was made.
This was before the days of steel castings. The advent of these
caused so much confusion that the term was soon dropped. When we
say tool steel, we nearly always refer to carbon-tool steel,
high-speed steel being usually designated by that name.

For many purposes carbon-steel cutters are still found best, although
where a large amount of material is to be removed at a rapid rate,
it has given way to high-speed steels.





Next: Carbon Steels For Different Tools

Previous: Take Time For Hardening



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