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Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

The Effect
The heating at 1,600 deg.F. gives the first heat treatment w...

Hardening Operation
Hardening a gear is accomplished as follows: The gear is tak...

Pyrometers For Molten Metal
Pyrometers for molten metal are connected to portable thermoc...

For Milling Cutters And Formed Tools
FORGING.--Forge as before.--ANNEALING.--Place the steel in a ...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

The Forging Of Steel
So much depends upon the forging of steel that this operation...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...



Carbon In Tool Steel






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, usually
contains from 80 to 125 points (or from 0.80 to 1.25 per cent)
of carbon, and none of the alloys which go to make up the high
speed steels. This was formerly known also as crucible or cast
steel, or crucible cast steel, from the way in which it was made.
This was before the days of steel castings. The advent of these
caused so much confusion that the term was soon dropped. When we
say tool steel, we nearly always refer to carbon-tool steel,
high-speed steel being usually designated by that name.

For many purposes carbon-steel cutters are still found best, although
where a large amount of material is to be removed at a rapid rate,
it has given way to high-speed steels.





Next: Carbon Steels For Different Tools

Previous: Take Time For Hardening



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