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Steel Making

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

High Speed Steel
For centuries the secret art of making tool steel was handed ...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

The Penetration Of Carbon
Carburized mild steel is used to a great extent in the manufa...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Pyrometers
Armor plate makers sometimes use the copper ball or Siemens' ...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...



Carbon In Tool Steel






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, usually
contains from 80 to 125 points (or from 0.80 to 1.25 per cent)
of carbon, and none of the alloys which go to make up the high
speed steels. This was formerly known also as crucible or cast
steel, or crucible cast steel, from the way in which it was made.
This was before the days of steel castings. The advent of these
caused so much confusion that the term was soon dropped. When we
say tool steel, we nearly always refer to carbon-tool steel,
high-speed steel being usually designated by that name.

For many purposes carbon-steel cutters are still found best, although
where a large amount of material is to be removed at a rapid rate,
it has given way to high-speed steels.





Next: Carbon Steels For Different Tools

Previous: Take Time For Hardening



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