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Steel Making

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Temperature For Annealing
Theoretically, annealing should be accomplished at a tempera...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Steel Can Be Worked Cold
As noted above, steel can be worked cold, as in the case of ...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...



Carbon In Tool Steel






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, usually
contains from 80 to 125 points (or from 0.80 to 1.25 per cent)
of carbon, and none of the alloys which go to make up the high
speed steels. This was formerly known also as crucible or cast
steel, or crucible cast steel, from the way in which it was made.
This was before the days of steel castings. The advent of these
caused so much confusion that the term was soon dropped. When we
say tool steel, we nearly always refer to carbon-tool steel,
high-speed steel being usually designated by that name.

For many purposes carbon-steel cutters are still found best, although
where a large amount of material is to be removed at a rapid rate,
it has given way to high-speed steels.





Next: Carbon Steels For Different Tools

Previous: Take Time For Hardening



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