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Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Calibration Of Pyrometer With Common Salt
An easy and convenient method for standardization and one whi...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Drop Forging Dies
The kind of steel used in the die of course influences the he...

Temperature For Annealing
Theoretically, annealing should be accomplished at a tempera...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

The Penetration Of Carbon
Carburized mild steel is used to a great extent in the manufa...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

The Electric Process
The fourth method of manufacturing steel is by the electric f...

Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...



Carbon In Tool Steel






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, usually
contains from 80 to 125 points (or from 0.80 to 1.25 per cent)
of carbon, and none of the alloys which go to make up the high
speed steels. This was formerly known also as crucible or cast
steel, or crucible cast steel, from the way in which it was made.
This was before the days of steel castings. The advent of these
caused so much confusion that the term was soon dropped. When we
say tool steel, we nearly always refer to carbon-tool steel,
high-speed steel being usually designated by that name.

For many purposes carbon-steel cutters are still found best, although
where a large amount of material is to be removed at a rapid rate,
it has given way to high-speed steels.





Next: Carbon Steels For Different Tools

Previous: Take Time For Hardening



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