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Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

For Milling Cutters And Formed Tools
FORGING.--Forge as before.--ANNEALING.--Place the steel in a ...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Standard Analysis
The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is t...

Plant For Forging Rifle Barrels
The forging of rifle barrels in large quantities and heat-tre...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....



Carbon In Tool Steel






Category: HARDENING CARBON STEEL FOR TOOLS

Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, usually
contains from 80 to 125 points (or from 0.80 to 1.25 per cent)
of carbon, and none of the alloys which go to make up the high
speed steels. This was formerly known also as crucible or cast
steel, or crucible cast steel, from the way in which it was made.
This was before the days of steel castings. The advent of these
caused so much confusion that the term was soon dropped. When we
say tool steel, we nearly always refer to carbon-tool steel,
high-speed steel being usually designated by that name.

For many purposes carbon-steel cutters are still found best, although
where a large amount of material is to be removed at a rapid rate,
it has given way to high-speed steels.





Next: Carbon Steels For Different Tools

Previous: Take Time For Hardening



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