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Preparing Parts For Local Case-hardening
At the works of the Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, ...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Refining The Grain
This is remedied by reheating the piece to a temperature slig...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

The Thermo-couple
With the application of the thermo-couple, the measurement of...

The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

The Leeds And Northrup Potentiometer System
The potentiometer pyrometer system is both flexible and subst...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Heat-treating Equipment And Methods For Mass Production
The heat-treating department of the Brown-Lipe-Chapin Company...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...



Annealing Alloy Steel






Category: ANNEALING

The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, refers
largely to nickel and chromium steel or a combination of both. These
steels are manufactured very largely by the open-hearth process,
although chromium steels are also a crucible product. It is next
to impossible to give proper directions for the proper annealing
of alloy steel unless the composition is known to the operator.

Nickel steels may be annealed at lower temperatures than carbon
steels, depending upon their alloy content. For instance, if a
pearlitic carbon steel may be annealed at 1,450 deg.C., the same analysis
containing 2-1/2 per cent nickel may be annealed at 1,360 deg.C. and
a 5 per cent nickel steel at 1,270 deg..

In order that high chromium steels may be readily machined, they
must be heated at or slightly above the critical for a very long
time, and cooled through the critical at an extremely slow rate.
For a steel containing 0.9 to 1.1 per cent carbon, under 0.50 per
cent manganese, and about 1.0 per cent chromium, Bullens recommends
the following anneal:

1. Heat to 1,700 or 1,750 deg.F.
2. Air cool to about 800 deg.F.
3. Soak at 1,425 to 1,450 deg.F.
4. Cool slowly in furnace.





Next: High-carbon Machinery Steel

Previous: Tool Or Crucible Steel



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