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Steel Making

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Hardening Operation
Hardening a gear is accomplished as follows: The gear is tak...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Phosphorus
Phosphorus is one of the impurities in steel, and it has been...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

The Leeds And Northrup Potentiometer System
The potentiometer pyrometer system is both flexible and subst...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...



Carbon Tool Steel






Category: THE FORGING OF STEEL

Heat to a bright red, about 1,500 to 1,550 deg.F.
Do not hammer steel when it cools down to a dark cherry red, or
just below its hardening point, as this creates surface cracks.





Next: Oil-hardening Steel

Previous: Forging High-speed Steel



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