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Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

Short Method Of Treatment
In the new method, the packed pots are run into the case-har...

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

Bessemer Process
The bessemer process consists of charging molten pig iron int...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Protectors For Thermo-couples
Thermo-couples must be protected from the danger of mechanica...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Lathe And Planer Tools
FORGING.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill, is parti...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Nickel-chromium
A combination of the characteristics of nickel and the charac...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...



Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer






Category: PYROMETRY AND PYROMETERS

In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to maintain
an operator at a central pyrometer, and by colored electric lights
at the furnaces, signal whether the temperatures are correct or
not. It is common practice to locate three lights above each
furnace-red, white and green. The red light burns when the temperature
is too low, the white light when the temperature is within certain
limits--for example, 20 deg.F. of the correct temperature--and the
green light when the temperature is too high.



Instruments to operate the lights automatically have been devised and
one made by Brown is shown in Fig. 130. The same form of instrument is
used for this purpose to automatically control furnace temperatures,
and the pointer is depressed at intervals of every 10 sec. on contacts
corresponding to the red, white and green lights.





Next: An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer

Previous: Compensating Leads



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