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Annealing Of High-speed Steel
For annealing high-speed steel, some makers recommend using g...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Introduction Of Carbon
The matter to which these notes are primarily directed is the...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Refining The Grain
This is remedied by reheating the piece to a temperature slig...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Pyrometers
Armor plate makers sometimes use the copper ball or Siemens' ...

Placing The Thermo-couples
The following illustrations from the Taylor Instrument Compan...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

Preventing Decarbonization Of Tool Steel
It is especially important to prevent decarbonization in such...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...



Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer






Category: PYROMETRY AND PYROMETERS

In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to maintain
an operator at a central pyrometer, and by colored electric lights
at the furnaces, signal whether the temperatures are correct or
not. It is common practice to locate three lights above each
furnace-red, white and green. The red light burns when the temperature
is too low, the white light when the temperature is within certain
limits--for example, 20 deg.F. of the correct temperature--and the
green light when the temperature is too high.



Instruments to operate the lights automatically have been devised and
one made by Brown is shown in Fig. 130. The same form of instrument is
used for this purpose to automatically control furnace temperatures,
and the pointer is depressed at intervals of every 10 sec. on contacts
corresponding to the red, white and green lights.





Next: An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer

Previous: Compensating Leads



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