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Steel Making

Annealing Method
Forgings which are too hard to machine are put in pots with ...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Plant For Forging Rifle Barrels
The forging of rifle barrels in large quantities and heat-tre...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Optical System And Electrical Circuit Of The Leeds & Northrup Optical Pyrometer
For extremely high temperature, the optical pyrometer is lar...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Hardening Operation
Hardening a gear is accomplished as follows: The gear is tak...

Refining The Grain
This is remedied by reheating the piece to a temperature slig...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

The Thermo-couple
With the application of the thermo-couple, the measurement of...



Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer






Category: PYROMETRY AND PYROMETERS

In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to maintain
an operator at a central pyrometer, and by colored electric lights
at the furnaces, signal whether the temperatures are correct or
not. It is common practice to locate three lights above each
furnace-red, white and green. The red light burns when the temperature
is too low, the white light when the temperature is within certain
limits--for example, 20 deg.F. of the correct temperature--and the
green light when the temperature is too high.



Instruments to operate the lights automatically have been devised and
one made by Brown is shown in Fig. 130. The same form of instrument is
used for this purpose to automatically control furnace temperatures,
and the pointer is depressed at intervals of every 10 sec. on contacts
corresponding to the red, white and green lights.





Next: An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer

Previous: Compensating Leads



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