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Steel Making

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Carbon Tool Steel
Heat to a bright red, about 1,500 to 1,550 deg.F. Do not ham...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Lathe And Planer Tools
TO FORGE.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill is parti...

The Packing Department
In Fig. 56 is shown the packing pots where the work is packe...

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Complete Calibration Of Pyrometers
For the complete calibration of a thermo-couple of unknown e...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...



Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer






Category: PYROMETRY AND PYROMETERS

In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to maintain
an operator at a central pyrometer, and by colored electric lights
at the furnaces, signal whether the temperatures are correct or
not. It is common practice to locate three lights above each
furnace-red, white and green. The red light burns when the temperature
is too low, the white light when the temperature is within certain
limits--for example, 20 deg.F. of the correct temperature--and the
green light when the temperature is too high.



Instruments to operate the lights automatically have been devised and
one made by Brown is shown in Fig. 130. The same form of instrument is
used for this purpose to automatically control furnace temperatures,
and the pointer is depressed at intervals of every 10 sec. on contacts
corresponding to the red, white and green lights.





Next: An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer

Previous: Compensating Leads



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