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Steel Making

It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...

Complete Calibration Of Pyrometers
For the complete calibration of a thermo-couple of unknown e...

Correction By Zero Adjustment
Many pyrometers are supplied with a zero adjuster, by means ...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Martien was probably never a serious contender for the honor ...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer


In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to maintain
an operator at a central pyrometer, and by colored electric lights
at the furnaces, signal whether the temperatures are correct or
not. It is common practice to locate three lights above each
furnace-red, white and green. The red light burns when the temperature
is too low, the white light when the temperature is within certain
limits--for example, 20 deg.F. of the correct temperature--and the
green light when the temperature is too high.

Instruments to operate the lights automatically have been devised and
one made by Brown is shown in Fig. 130. The same form of instrument is
used for this purpose to automatically control furnace temperatures,
and the pointer is depressed at intervals of every 10 sec. on contacts
corresponding to the red, white and green lights.

Next: An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer

Previous: Compensating Leads

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