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Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

The Forging Of Steel
So much depends upon the forging of steel that this operation...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

The Electric Process
The fourth method of manufacturing steel is by the electric f...

Suggestions For Handling High-speed Steels
The following suggestions for handling high-speed steels are ...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Piston Pin
The piston pin on an aviation engine must possess maximum res...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Refining The Grain
This is remedied by reheating the piece to a temperature slig...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...



Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer






Category: PYROMETRY AND PYROMETERS

In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to maintain
an operator at a central pyrometer, and by colored electric lights
at the furnaces, signal whether the temperatures are correct or
not. It is common practice to locate three lights above each
furnace-red, white and green. The red light burns when the temperature
is too low, the white light when the temperature is within certain
limits--for example, 20 deg.F. of the correct temperature--and the
green light when the temperature is too high.



Instruments to operate the lights automatically have been devised and
one made by Brown is shown in Fig. 130. The same form of instrument is
used for this purpose to automatically control furnace temperatures,
and the pointer is depressed at intervals of every 10 sec. on contacts
corresponding to the red, white and green lights.





Next: An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer

Previous: Compensating Leads



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