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Carburizing Low-carbon Sleeves
Low-carbon sleeves are carburized and pushed on malleable-ir...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Hardening
The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

Lathe And Planer Tools
FORGING.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill, is parti...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Machineability
Reheating for machine ability was done at 100 deg. less than ...

Plant For Forging Rifle Barrels
The forging of rifle barrels in large quantities and heat-tre...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

Preventing Carburizing By Copper-plating
Copper-plating has been found effective and must have a thick...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

The Penetration Of Carbon
Carburized mild steel is used to a great extent in the manufa...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Correction For Cold-junction Errors
The voltage generated by a thermo-couple of an electric pyrom...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...



Alloying Elements






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

Commercial steels of even the simplest types
are therefore primarily alloys of iron and carbon. Impurities and
their remedies are always present: sulphur, phosphorus, silicon
and manganese--to say nothing of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon oxide
gases, about which we know very little. It has been found that other
metals, if added to well-made steel, produce definite improvements
in certain directions, and these alloy steels have found much
use in the last ten years. Alloy steels, in addition to the
above-mentioned elements, may commonly contain one or more of the
following, in varying amounts: Nickel (Ni), Chromium (Cr), Vanadium
(Va), Tungsten (W), Molybdenum (Mo). These steels will be discussed
at more length in Chapters III and IV.





Next: Properties Of Steel

Previous: Manganese



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