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Steel Making

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Drop Forging Dies
The kind of steel used in the die of course influences the he...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Heat Treatment Of Punches And Dies Shears Taps Etc
HEATING.--The degree to which tools of the above classes shou...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...

High Speed Steel
For centuries the secret art of making tool steel was handed ...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Protectors For Thermo-couples
Thermo-couples must be protected from the danger of mechanica...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

Temperature For Annealing
Theoretically, annealing should be accomplished at a tempera...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Detrimental Elements
Sulphur and phosphorus are two elements known to be detrimen...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Lathe And Planer Tools
FORGING.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill, is parti...



Alloying Elements






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

Commercial steels of even the simplest types
are therefore primarily alloys of iron and carbon. Impurities and
their remedies are always present: sulphur, phosphorus, silicon
and manganese--to say nothing of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon oxide
gases, about which we know very little. It has been found that other
metals, if added to well-made steel, produce definite improvements
in certain directions, and these alloy steels have found much
use in the last ten years. Alloy steels, in addition to the
above-mentioned elements, may commonly contain one or more of the
following, in varying amounts: Nickel (Ni), Chromium (Cr), Vanadium
(Va), Tungsten (W), Molybdenum (Mo). These steels will be discussed
at more length in Chapters III and IV.





Next: Properties Of Steel

Previous: Manganese



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