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Steel Making

Placing The Thermo-couples
The following illustrations from the Taylor Instrument Compan...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Short Method Of Treatment
In the new method, the packed pots are run into the case-har...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

The Packing Department
In Fig. 56 is shown the packing pots where the work is packe...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

The Leeds And Northrup Potentiometer System
The potentiometer pyrometer system is both flexible and subst...

Sulphur
Sulphur is another impurity and high sulphur is even a greate...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Heat Treatment Of Punches And Dies Shears Taps Etc
HEATING.--The degree to which tools of the above classes shou...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...



Alloying Elements






Category: COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES OF STEEL

Commercial steels of even the simplest types
are therefore primarily alloys of iron and carbon. Impurities and
their remedies are always present: sulphur, phosphorus, silicon
and manganese--to say nothing of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon oxide
gases, about which we know very little. It has been found that other
metals, if added to well-made steel, produce definite improvements
in certain directions, and these alloy steels have found much
use in the last ten years. Alloy steels, in addition to the
above-mentioned elements, may commonly contain one or more of the
following, in varying amounts: Nickel (Ni), Chromium (Cr), Vanadium
(Va), Tungsten (W), Molybdenum (Mo). These steels will be discussed
at more length in Chapters III and IV.





Next: Properties Of Steel

Previous: Manganese



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