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   Home - Steel Making - Categories - Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Annealing
There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Properties Of Steel
Steels are known by certain tests. Early tests were more or l...

Preventing Decarbonization Of Tool Steel
It is especially important to prevent decarbonization in such...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Hints For Tool Steel Users
Do not hesitate to ask for information from the maker as to t...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...



Annealing Of High-speed Steel






Category: ANNEALING

For annealing high-speed steel, some makers recommend using ground
mica, charcoal, lime, fine dry ashes or lake sand as a packing
in the annealing boxes. Mixtures of one part charcoal, one part
lime and three parts of sand are also suggested, or two parts of
ashes may be substituted for the one part of lime.

To bring about the softest structure or machine ability of high-speed
steel, it should be packed in charcoal in boxes or pipes, carefully
sealed at all points, so that no gases will escape or air be admitted.
It should be heated slowly to not less than 1,450 deg.F. and the steel
must not be removed from its packing until it is cool. Slow heating
means that the high heat must have penetrated to the very core of
the steel.

When the steel is heated clear through it has been in the furnace
long enough. If the steel can remain in the furnace and cool down
with it, there will be no danger of air blasts or sudden or uneven
cooling. If not, remove the box and cover quickly with dry ashes,
sand or lime until it becomes cold.

Too high a heat or maintaining the heat for too long a period,
produces a harsh, coarse grain and greatly increases the liability
to crack in hardening. It also reduces the strength and toughness
of the steel.

Steel which is to be used for making tools with teeth, such as
taps, reamers and milling cutters, should not be annealed too much.
When the steel is too soft it is more apt to tear in cutting and
makes it more difficult to cut a smooth thread or other surface.
Moderate annealing is found best for tools of this kind.





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