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Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

High Speed Steel
For centuries the secret art of making tool steel was handed ...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Carburizing Low-carbon Sleeves
Low-carbon sleeves are carburized and pushed on malleable-ir...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Calibration Of Pyrometer With Common Salt
An easy and convenient method for standardization and one whi...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Carburizing Material
The simplest carburizing substance is charcoal. It is also th...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...



Air-hardening Steels






Category: FURNACES

These steels are recommended for boring,
turning and planing where the cost of high-speed seems excessive.
They are also recommended for hard wood knives, for roughing and
finishing bronze and brass, and for hot bolt forging dies. This
steel cannot be cut or punched cold but can be shaped and ground
on abrasive wheels of various kinds.

It should be heated slowly and evenly for forging and kept as evenly
heated at a bright red as possible. It should not be forged after
it cools to a dark red.

After the tool is made, heat it again to a bright red and lay it
down to cool in a dry place or it can be cooled in a cold, dry
air blast. Water must be kept away from it while it is hot.





Next: Typical Oil-fired Furnaces

Previous: Hardening High-speed Steel



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