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Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Steel Before The 1850's
In spite of a rapid increase in the use of machines and the ...

Properties Of Steel
Steels are known by certain tests. Early tests were more or l...

Surface Carburizing
Carburizing, commonly called case-hardening, is the art of pr...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Nickel-chromium
A combination of the characteristics of nickel and the charac...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

Application To The Automotive Industry
The information given on the various parts of the Liberty eng...

Introduction Of Carbon
The matter to which these notes are primarily directed is the...

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

Quenching
It is considered good practice to quench alloy steels from th...

Preparing Parts For Local Case-hardening
At the works of the Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, ...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...



Air-hardening Steels






Category: FURNACES

These steels are recommended for boring,
turning and planing where the cost of high-speed seems excessive.
They are also recommended for hard wood knives, for roughing and
finishing bronze and brass, and for hot bolt forging dies. This
steel cannot be cut or punched cold but can be shaped and ground
on abrasive wheels of various kinds.

It should be heated slowly and evenly for forging and kept as evenly
heated at a bright red as possible. It should not be forged after
it cools to a dark red.

After the tool is made, heat it again to a bright red and lay it
down to cool in a dry place or it can be cooled in a cold, dry
air blast. Water must be kept away from it while it is hot.





Next: Typical Oil-fired Furnaces

Previous: Hardening High-speed Steel



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