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Application To The Automotive Industry
The information given on the various parts of the Liberty eng...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

Double Annealing
Water annealing consists in heating the piece, allowing it to...

Temperatures To Use
As soon as the temperature of the steel reaches 100 deg.C. (...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

S A E Heat Treatments
The Society of Automotive Engineers have adopted certain heat...

Using Illuminating Gas
The choice of a carburizing furnace depends greatly on the fa...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Carbon In Tool Steel
Carbon tool steel, or tool steel as it is commonly called, us...

Nickel-chromium
A combination of the characteristics of nickel and the charac...

Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels
Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contract...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...

The Packing Department
In Fig. 56 is shown the packing pots where the work is packe...



Air-hardening Steels






Category: FURNACES

These steels are recommended for boring,
turning and planing where the cost of high-speed seems excessive.
They are also recommended for hard wood knives, for roughing and
finishing bronze and brass, and for hot bolt forging dies. This
steel cannot be cut or punched cold but can be shaped and ground
on abrasive wheels of various kinds.

It should be heated slowly and evenly for forging and kept as evenly
heated at a bright red as possible. It should not be forged after
it cools to a dark red.

After the tool is made, heat it again to a bright red and lay it
down to cool in a dry place or it can be cooled in a cold, dry
air blast. Water must be kept away from it while it is hot.





Next: Typical Oil-fired Furnaces

Previous: Hardening High-speed Steel



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