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Steel Making

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Heating
Although it is possible to work steels cold, to an extent de...

Carburizing Low-carbon Sleeves
Low-carbon sleeves are carburized and pushed on malleable-ir...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Brown Automatic Signaling Pyrometer
In large heat-treating plants it has been customary to mainta...

Annealing
There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Annealing Method
Forgings which are too hard to machine are put in pots with ...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

Pyrometers For Molten Metal
Pyrometers for molten metal are connected to portable thermoc...



Air-hardening Steels






Category: FURNACES

These steels are recommended for boring,
turning and planing where the cost of high-speed seems excessive.
They are also recommended for hard wood knives, for roughing and
finishing bronze and brass, and for hot bolt forging dies. This
steel cannot be cut or punched cold but can be shaped and ground
on abrasive wheels of various kinds.

It should be heated slowly and evenly for forging and kept as evenly
heated at a bright red as possible. It should not be forged after
it cools to a dark red.

After the tool is made, heat it again to a bright red and lay it
down to cool in a dry place or it can be cooled in a cold, dry
air blast. Water must be kept away from it while it is hot.





Next: Typical Oil-fired Furnaces

Previous: Hardening High-speed Steel



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