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The Effect Of Tempering On Water-quenched Gages
The following information has been supplied by Automatic and ...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Introduction Of Carbon
The matter to which these notes are primarily directed is the...

Tempering Round Dies
A number of circular dies of carbon tool steel for use in too...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Protective Screens For Furnaces
Workmen needlessly exposed to the flames, heat and glare from...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Steel For Chisels And Punches
The highest grades of carbon or tempering steels are to be re...

High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel
High-chromium, or what is called stainless steel containing f...

Ebbw Vale And The Bessemer Process
After his British Association address in August 1856, Besseme...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...



Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

All high-carbon tool steels are
heated in a cyanide bath. With this bath, the heat can be controlled
within 3 deg. The steel is evenly heated without exposure to the
air, resulting in work which is not warped and on which there is no
scale. The cyanide bath is, of course, not available for high-speed
steel because of the very high temperatures necessary.





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