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Steel Making

Rate Of Cooling
At the option of the manufacturer, the above treatment of gea...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing
Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for ...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Hardening High-speed Steel
In forging use coke for fuel in the forge. Heat steel slowly ...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Heat-treating Equipment And Methods For Mass Production
The heat-treating department of the Brown-Lipe-Chapin Company...

There is no mystery or secret about the proper annealing of d...

Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

The Packing Department
In Fig. 56 is shown the packing pots where the work is packe...

The forgings can be hardened by cooling in still air or quen...

Lathe And Planer Tools
TO FORGE.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill is parti...

Detrimental Elements
Sulphur and phosphorus are two elements known to be detrimen...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Application Of Liberty Engine Materials To The Automotive Industry
The success of the Liberty engine program was an engineer...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

Shrinking And Enlarging Work
Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel


This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Johnston
on two types of steel: one containing 0.30 per cent carbon, 0.012
per cent phosphorus, and 0.860 per cent copper, and the other 0.365
per cent carbon, 0.053 per cent phosphorus, and 0.030 per cent
copper. The accompanying chart in Fig. 13 shows that high-copper
steel has decided superiority in tensile strength, yield point and
ultimate strength, while the ductility is practically the same.
Hardness tests by both methods show high-copper steel to be harder
than low-copper, and the Charpy shock tests show high-copper steel
also superior to low-copper. The tests confirm those made by Stead,
showing that the behavior of copper steel resembles that of nickel
steel. The high-copper steels show finer grain than the low-copper.
The quenched and drawn specimens of high-copper steel were found
to be slightly more martensitic.

Next: High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel

Previous: Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels

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