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Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Refining The Grain
This is remedied by reheating the piece to a temperature slig...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

Conclusions
Martien was probably never a serious contender for the honor ...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Vanadium
Vanadium has a very marked effect upon alloy steels rich in c...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Nickel-chromium
A combination of the characteristics of nickel and the charac...

Bessemer Process
The bessemer process consists of charging molten pig iron int...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Carbon Tool Steel
Heat to a bright red, about 1,500 to 1,550 deg.F. Do not ham...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...



Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Johnston
on two types of steel: one containing 0.30 per cent carbon, 0.012
per cent phosphorus, and 0.860 per cent copper, and the other 0.365
per cent carbon, 0.053 per cent phosphorus, and 0.030 per cent
copper. The accompanying chart in Fig. 13 shows that high-copper
steel has decided superiority in tensile strength, yield point and
ultimate strength, while the ductility is practically the same.
Hardness tests by both methods show high-copper steel to be harder
than low-copper, and the Charpy shock tests show high-copper steel
also superior to low-copper. The tests confirm those made by Stead,
showing that the behavior of copper steel resembles that of nickel
steel. The high-copper steels show finer grain than the low-copper.
The quenched and drawn specimens of high-copper steel were found
to be slightly more martensitic.





Next: High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel

Previous: Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels



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