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Chrome-nickel Steel
Forging heat of chrome-nickel steel depends very largely on ...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Temperature Recording And Regulation
Each furnace is equipped with pyrometers, but the reading an...

Lathe And Planer Tools
TO FORGE.--Gently warm the steel to remove any chill is parti...

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

Fatigue Tests
It has been known for fifty years that a beam or rod would fa...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Tempering Colors On Carbon Steels
Opinions differ as to the temperature which is indicated by t...

Manganese
MANGANESE is a metal much like iron. Its chemical symbol is M...

Annealing
ANNEALING can be done by heating to temperatures ranging from...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Process Of Carburizing
Carburizing imparts a shell of high-carbon content to a low-...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

A Satisfactory Luting Mixture
A mixture of fireclay and sand will be found very satisfactor...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...



Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Johnston
on two types of steel: one containing 0.30 per cent carbon, 0.012
per cent phosphorus, and 0.860 per cent copper, and the other 0.365
per cent carbon, 0.053 per cent phosphorus, and 0.030 per cent
copper. The accompanying chart in Fig. 13 shows that high-copper
steel has decided superiority in tensile strength, yield point and
ultimate strength, while the ductility is practically the same.
Hardness tests by both methods show high-copper steel to be harder
than low-copper, and the Charpy shock tests show high-copper steel
also superior to low-copper. The tests confirm those made by Stead,
showing that the behavior of copper steel resembles that of nickel
steel. The high-copper steels show finer grain than the low-copper.
The quenched and drawn specimens of high-copper steel were found
to be slightly more martensitic.





Next: High-chromium Or Rust-proof Steel

Previous: Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels



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