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Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Pyrometry And Pyrometers
A knowledge of the fundamental principles of pyrometry, or th...

Machineability
Reheating for machine ability was done at 100 deg. less than ...

Tungsten
Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Temperature For Annealing
Theoretically, annealing should be accomplished at a tempera...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Standard Analysis
The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is t...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Short Method Of Treatment
In the new method, the packed pots are run into the case-har...

Heat Treatment Of Milling Cutters Drills Reamers Etc
THE FIRE.--Gas and electric furnaces designed for high heats ...

An Automatic Temperature Control Pyrometer
Automatic temperature control instruments are similar to the ...

Crucible Steel
Crucible steel is still made by melting material in a clay or...

Quenching Tool Steel
To secure proper hardness, the cooling of quenching of steel ...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...



Heat Treatment Of Lathe Planer And Similar Tools






Category: HIGH-SPEED STEEL

FIRE.--For these tools a good fire is one made of hard foundry
coke, broken in small pieces, in an ordinary blacksmith forge with
a few bricks laid over the top to form a hollow fire. The bricks
should be thoroughly heated before tools are heated. Hard coal
may be used very successfully in place of hard coke and will give
a higher heat. It is very easy to give Blue Chip the proper heat
if care is used in making up the fire.

FORGING.--Heat slowly and uniformly to a good forging heat. Do
not hammer the steel after it cools below a bright red. Avoid as
much as possible heating the body of the tool, so as to retain
the natural toughness in the neck of the tool.

HARDENING.--Heat the point of the tool to an extreme white heat
(about 2,200 deg.F.) until the flux runs. This heat should be the highest
possible short of melting the point. Care should be taken to confine
the heat as near to the point as possible so as to leave the annealing
and consequent toughness in the neck of the tool and where the tool
is held in the tool post.

COOL in an air blast, the open air or in oil, depending upon the
tools or the work they are to do.

For roughing tools temper need not be drawn except for work where
the edge tends to crumble on account of being too hard.

For finishing tools draw the temper to suit the purpose for which
they are to be used.

GRIND thoroughly on dry wheel (or wet wheel if care is used to prevent
checking).





Next: Heat Treatment Of Milling Cutters Drills Reamers Etc

Previous: Lathe And Planer Tools



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