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   Home - Steel Making - Categories - Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Tensile Properties
Strength of a metal is usually expressed in the number of pou...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

Affinity Of Nickel Steel For Carbon
The carbon- and nickel-steel gears are carburized separately...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

The Theory Of Tempering
Steel that has been hardened is generally harder and more br...

Flange Shields For Furnaces
Such portable flame shields as the one illustrated in Fig. 1...

The Electric Process
The fourth method of manufacturing steel is by the electric f...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Silicon
SILICON is a very widespread element (symbol Si), being an es...

Corrosion
This steel like any other steel when distorted by cold worki...

Preparing Parts For Local Case-hardening
At the works of the Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, ...

Standard Analysis
The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is t...

Crankshaft
The crankshaft was the most highly stressed part of the entir...

Protectors For Thermo-couples
Thermo-couples must be protected from the danger of mechanica...

Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...



Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks






Category: HEAT TREATMENT OF STEEL

This section is based on a paper read before the American Gear
Manufacturers' Association at White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., Apr.
18, 1918.

Great advancement has been made in the heat treating and hardening of
gears. In this advancement the chemical and metallurgical laboratory
have played no small part. During this time, however, the condition
of the blanks as they come to the machine shop to be machined has
not received its share of attention.

There are two distinct types of gears, both types having their
champions, namely, carburized and heat-treated. The difference
between the two in the matter of steel composition is entirely in
the carbon content, the carbon never running higher than 25-point
in the carburizing type, while in the heat-treated gears the carbon
is seldom lower than 35-point. The difference in the final gear
is the hardness. The carburized gear is file hard on the surface,
with a soft, tough and ductile core to withstand shock, while the
heat-treated gear has a surface that can be touched by a file with
a core of the same hardness as the outer surface.





Next: Annealing Work

Previous: Judging The Heat Of Steel



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