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William Kelly's Air-boiling Process
An account of Bessemer's address to the British Association w...

Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Heat Treatment Of Gear Blanks
This section is based on a paper read before the American Gea...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

High-carbon Machinery Steel
The carbon content of this steel is above 30 points and is ha...

Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Annealing Work
With the exception of several of the higher types of alloy s...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Typical Oil-fired Furnaces
Several types of standard oil-fired furnaces are shown herew...

Furnace Data
In order to give definite information concerning furnaces, fu...

Pyrometry And Pyrometers
A knowledge of the fundamental principles of pyrometry, or th...

Carbon-steel Forgings
Low-stressed, carbon-steel forgings include such parts as car...

Hardness Testing
The word hardness is used to express various properties of me...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Gas Consumption For Carburizing


Although the advantages offered by the gas-fired furnace for carburizing
have been generally recognized in the past from points of view as
close temperature regulation, decreased attendance, and greater
convenience, very little information has been published regarding
the consumption of gas for this process. It has therefore been a
matter of great difficulty to obtain authentic information upon
this point, either from makers or users of such furnaces.

In view of this, the details of actual consumption of gas on a
regular customer's order job will be of interest. The Revergen
furnace, manufactured by the Davis Furnace Company, Luton, Bedford,
England, was used on this job, and is provided with regenerators
and fired with illuminating gas at ordinary pressure, the air being
introduced to the furnace at a slight pressure of 3 to 4 in. water
gage. The material was charged into a cold furnace, raised to 1,652 deg.F.,
and maintained at that temperature for 8 hr. to give the necessary
depth of case. The work consisted of automobile gears packed in
six boxes, the total weight being 713 lb. The required temperature
of 1,652 deg.F. was obtained in 70 min. from lighting up, and a summary
of the data is shown in the following table:

Cubic Foot Total
Per Pound Number of
of Load Cubic Foot
Gas to raise furnace and charge from
cold to 1,652 deg.F., 70 min. 1.29 925
Gas to maintain 1,652 deg.F. for 1st hour 0.38 275
Gas to maintain 1,652 deg.F. for 2nd hour 0.42 300
Gas to maintain 1,652 deg.F. for 3rd hour 0.38 275
Gas to maintain 1,652 deg.F. for 4th hour 0.42 300
Gas to maintain 1,652 deg.F. for 5th hour 0.49 350
Gas to maintain 1,652 deg.F. for 6th hour 0.49 350
Gas to maintain 1,652 deg.F. for 7th hour 0.45 325
Gas to maintain 1,652 deg.F. for 8th hour 0.45 325

The overall gas consumption for this run of 9 hr. 10 min. was only
4.8 cu. ft. per pound of load.

Next: The Care Of Carburizing Compounds

Previous: A Satisfactory Luting Mixture

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