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Effect Of Different Carburizing Material
[Illustrations: FIGS. 33 to 37.] Each of these different p...

Introduction Of Carbon
The matter to which these notes are primarily directed is the...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel
This shows the result of tests by C. R. Hayward and A. B. Joh...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Carburizing By Gas
The process of carburizing by gas, briefly mentioned on page ...

Effects Of Proper Annealing
Proper annealing of low-carbon steels causes a complete solu...

Critical Points
One of the most important means of investigating the properti...

Annealing Of Rifle Components At Springfield Armory
In general, all forgings of the components of the arms manufa...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Properties Of Steel
Steels are known by certain tests. Early tests were more or l...

Sulphur
Sulphur is another impurity and high sulphur is even a greate...

Carbon Tool Steel
Heat to a bright red, about 1,500 to 1,550 deg.F. Do not ham...

The Pyrometer And Its Use
In the heat treatment of steel, it has become absolutely nece...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Tool Or Crucible Steel
Crucible steel can be annealed either in muffled furnace or b...

Testing And Inspection Of Heat Treatment
The hard parts of the gear must be so hard that a new mill f...



Forging High-speed Steel






Category: THE FORGING OF STEEL

Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800
to 2,000 deg.F. and forge thoroughly and uniformly. If the forging
operation is prolonged do not continue forging the tool when the
steel begins to stiffen under the hammer. Do not forge below 1,700 deg.F.
(a dark lemon or orange color). Reheat frequently rather than prolong
the hammering at the low heats.

After finishing the forging allow the tool to cool as slowly as
possible in lime or dry ashes; avoid placing the tool on the damp
ground or in a draught of air. Use a good clean fire for heating.
Do not allow the tool to soak at the forging heat. Do not heat any
more of the tool than is necessary in order to forge it to the
desired shape.





Next: Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Steel Can Be Worked Cold



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