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Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Knowing What Takes Place
How are we to know if we have given a piece of steel the ver...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

Forging High-speed Steel
Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800 to 2,000 deg.F....

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...

Preventing Cracks In Hardening
The blacksmith in the small shop, where equipment is usually ...

Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...

Uses Of The Various Tempers Of Carbon Tool Steel
DIE TEMPER.--No. 3: All kinds of dies for deep stamping, pres...

Cyanide Bath For Tool Steels
All high-carbon tool steels are heated in a cyanide bath. Wi...

Composition And Properties Of Steel
It is a remarkable fact that one can look through a dozen tex...

Annealing To Relieve Internal Stresses
Work quenched from a high temperature and not afterward tempe...

Tool Or Crucible Steel
Crucible steel can be annealed either in muffled furnace or b...

Gears
The material used for all gears on the Liberty engine was sel...

Heating Of Manganese Steel
Another form of heat-treating furnace is that which is used ...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Steel Worked In Austenitic State
As a general rule steel should be worked when it is in the a...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...



Forging High-speed Steel






Category: THE FORGING OF STEEL

Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800
to 2,000 deg.F. and forge thoroughly and uniformly. If the forging
operation is prolonged do not continue forging the tool when the
steel begins to stiffen under the hammer. Do not forge below 1,700 deg.F.
(a dark lemon or orange color). Reheat frequently rather than prolong
the hammering at the low heats.

After finishing the forging allow the tool to cool as slowly as
possible in lime or dry ashes; avoid placing the tool on the damp
ground or in a draught of air. Use a good clean fire for heating.
Do not allow the tool to soak at the forging heat. Do not heat any
more of the tool than is necessary in order to forge it to the
desired shape.





Next: Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Steel Can Be Worked Cold



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