The IChing - A place to get questions answered Visit The IChingInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
   Home - Steel Making - Categories - Manufacturing and the Economy of Machinery

Steel Making

Shrinking And Enlarging Work
Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling...

Heat Treatment Of Punches And Dies Shears Taps Etc
HEATING.--The degree to which tools of the above classes shou...

Drop Forging Dies
The kind of steel used in the die of course influences the he...

Quality And Structure
The quality of high-speed steel is dependent to a very great ...

Hardening High-speed Steels
We will now take up the matter of hardening high-speed steels...

The Electric Process
The fourth method of manufacturing steel is by the electric f...

Robert Mushet
Robert (Forester) Mushet (1811-1891), born in the Forest of D...

Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Instructions For Working High-speed Steel
Owing to the wide variations in the composition of high-speed...

Placing Of Pyrometers
When installing a pyrometer, care should be taken that it re...

Bessemer Process
The bessemer process consists of charging molten pig iron int...

Air-hardening Steels
These steels are recommended for boring, turning and planing...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Molybdenum
Molybdenum steels have been made commercially for twenty-five...

Nickel
Nickel may be considered as the toughest among the non-rare a...

Compensating Leads
By the use of compensating leads, formed of the same materia...

Take Time For Hardening
Uneven heating and poor quenching has caused loss of many ve...



Forging High-speed Steel






Category: THE FORGING OF STEEL

Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800
to 2,000 deg.F. and forge thoroughly and uniformly. If the forging
operation is prolonged do not continue forging the tool when the
steel begins to stiffen under the hammer. Do not forge below 1,700 deg.F.
(a dark lemon or orange color). Reheat frequently rather than prolong
the hammering at the low heats.

After finishing the forging allow the tool to cool as slowly as
possible in lime or dry ashes; avoid placing the tool on the damp
ground or in a draught of air. Use a good clean fire for heating.
Do not allow the tool to soak at the forging heat. Do not heat any
more of the tool than is necessary in order to forge it to the
desired shape.





Next: Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Steel Can Be Worked Cold



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 3320