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The Modern Hardening Room
A hardening room of today means a very different place from ...

Annealing Method
Forgings which are too hard to machine are put in pots with ...

Hardening
Steel is hardened by quenching from above the upper critical....

Pyrometers For Molten Metal
Pyrometers for molten metal are connected to portable thermoc...

Impact Tests
Impact tests are of considerable importance as an indication ...

The Influence Of Size
The size of the piece influences the physical properties obta...

Leeds And Northrup Optical Pyrometer
The principles of this very popular method of measuring tempe...

Cutting-off Steel From Bar
To cut a piece from an annealed bar, cut off with a hack saw,...

Pickling The Forgings
The forgings were then pickled in a hot solution of either ni...

Machineability
Reheating for machine ability was done at 100 deg. less than ...

Composition Of Transmission-gear Steel
If the nickel content of this steel is eliminated, and the pe...

Preparing Parts For Local Case-hardening
At the works of the Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company, ...

Heat Treatment Of Steel
Heat treatment consists in heating and cooling metal at defin...

Oil-hardening Steel
Heat slowly and uniformly to 1,450 deg.F. and forge thorough...

Testing And Inspection Of Heat Treatment
The hard parts of the gear must be so hard that a new mill f...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Heat Treatment Of Axles
Parts of this general type should be heat-treated to show the...

Judging The Heat Of Steel
While the use of a pyrometer is of course the only way to hav...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Highly Stressed Parts
The highly stressed parts on the Liberty engine consisted of ...



Forging High-speed Steel






Category: THE FORGING OF STEEL

Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800
to 2,000 deg.F. and forge thoroughly and uniformly. If the forging
operation is prolonged do not continue forging the tool when the
steel begins to stiffen under the hammer. Do not forge below 1,700 deg.F.
(a dark lemon or orange color). Reheat frequently rather than prolong
the hammering at the low heats.

After finishing the forging allow the tool to cool as slowly as
possible in lime or dry ashes; avoid placing the tool on the damp
ground or in a draught of air. Use a good clean fire for heating.
Do not allow the tool to soak at the forging heat. Do not heat any
more of the tool than is necessary in order to forge it to the
desired shape.





Next: Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Steel Can Be Worked Cold



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