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Phosphorus
PHOSPHORUS is an element (symbol P) which enters the metal fr...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Heavy Forging Practice
In heavy forging practice where the metal is being worked at...

Quenching The Work
In some operations case-hardened work is quenched from the bo...

Pyrometers For Molten Metal
Pyrometers for molten metal are connected to portable thermoc...

Heat Treatment Of Milling Cutters Drills Reamers Etc
THE FIRE.--Gas and electric furnaces designed for high heats ...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Annealing Method
Forgings which are too hard to machine are put in pots with ...

Carbon Steels For Different Tools
All users of tool steels should carefully study the different...

Rate Of Absorption
According to Guillet, the absorption of carbon is favored by ...

Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...

The Electric Process
The fourth method of manufacturing steel is by the electric f...

Chromium
Chromium when alloyed with steel, has the characteristic func...

The Quenching Tank
The quenching tank is an important feature of apparatus in c...

Connecting Rods
The material used for all connecting rods on the Liberty engi...

Carbon Tool Steel
Heat to a bright red, about 1,500 to 1,550 deg.F. Do not ham...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Care In Annealing
Not only will benefits in machining be found by careful anne...

Properties Of Alloy Steels
The following table shows the percentages of carbon, manganes...

Case-hardening Treatments For Various Steels
Plain water, salt water and linseed oil are the three most co...



Forging High-speed Steel






Category: THE FORGING OF STEEL

Heat very slowly and carefully to from 1,800
to 2,000 deg.F. and forge thoroughly and uniformly. If the forging
operation is prolonged do not continue forging the tool when the
steel begins to stiffen under the hammer. Do not forge below 1,700 deg.F.
(a dark lemon or orange color). Reheat frequently rather than prolong
the hammering at the low heats.

After finishing the forging allow the tool to cool as slowly as
possible in lime or dry ashes; avoid placing the tool on the damp
ground or in a draught of air. Use a good clean fire for heating.
Do not allow the tool to soak at the forging heat. Do not heat any
more of the tool than is necessary in order to forge it to the
desired shape.





Next: Carbon Tool Steel

Previous: Steel Can Be Worked Cold



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