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Steel Making

Annealing In Bone
Steel and cast iron may both be annealed in granulated bone. ...

Sulphur
SULPHUR is another element (symbol S) which is always found i...

For Milling Cutters And Formed Tools
FORGING.--Forge as before.--ANNEALING.--Place the steel in a ...

Making Steel Balls
Steel balls are made from rods or coils according to size, st...

Heat-treating Department
The heat-treating department occupies an L-shaped building. ...

Shrinking And Enlarging Work
Steel can be shrunk or enlarged by proper heating and cooling...

Placing The Thermo-couples
The following illustrations from the Taylor Instrument Compan...

Standard Analysis
The selection of a standard analysis by the manufacturer is t...

Silicon
Silicon prevents, to a large extent, defects such as gas bubb...

Liberty Motor Connecting Rods
The requirements for materials for the Liberty motor connecti...

Restoring Overheated Steel
The effect of heat treatment on overheated steel is shown gra...

Hardening Carbon Steel For Tools
For years the toolmaker had full sway in regard to make of st...

Annealing Alloy Steel
The term alloy steel, from the steel maker's point of view, r...

A Chromium-cobalt Steel
The Latrobe Steel Company make a high-speed steel without tun...

Separating The Work From The Compound
During the pulling of the heat, the pots are dumped upon a ca...

Classifications Of Steel
Among makers and sellers, carbon tool-steels are classed by g...

Manganese
Manganese adds considerably to the tensile strength of steel,...

Alloying Elements
Commercial steels of even the simplest types are therefore p...

Mushet And Bessemer
That Mushet was "used" by Ebbw Vale against Bessemer is, perh...

Blending The Compound
Essentially, this consists of the sturdy, power-driven separa...



Non-shrinking Oil-hardening Steels






Category: ALLOYS AND THEIR EFFECT UPON STEEL

Certain steels have a very low rate of expansion and contraction
in hardening and are very desirable for test plugs, gages, punches
and dies, for milling cutters, taps, reamers, hard steel bushings
and similar work.

It is recommended that for forging these steels it be heated slowly
and uniformly to a bright red, but not in a direct flame or blast.
Harden at a dull red heat, about 1,300 deg.F. A clean coal or coke
fire, or a good muffle-gas furnace will give best results. Fish
oil is good for quenching although in some cases warm water will
give excellent results. The steel should be kept moving in the bath
until perfectly cold. Heated and cooled in this way the steel is
very tough, takes a good cutting edge and has very little expansion
or contraction which makes it desirable for long taps where the
accuracy of lead is important.

The composition of these steels is as follows:

Per cent
Manganese 1.40 to 1.60
Carbon 0.80 to 0.90
Vanadium 0.20 to 0.25





Next: Effect Of A Small Amount Of Copper In Medium-carbon Steel

Previous: Properties Of Alloy Steels



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